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Hayley Atkins

Kunawarritji workshop, 2008

Location: Kunawarritji, Well 33

Date: 2008

Event Description: In April 2008 a big mob of Martumili artists travelled out to Kunawarritji (Well 33) and Kunkun for a week long series of painting and weaving workshops. Celebrated fibre artist Nalda Searles facilitated the weaving workshops, and some of the paintings produced at Kunawarritji are now considered 'hero' works in the National Museum of Australia's Canning Stock Route collection. Martu photographer Morika Biljabu documented these workshops and a number of her images were published in the Weekend Australian Magazine in the feature article 'On the Whitefellas Road' by Victoria Laurie.

People: Morika Biljabu, Victoria Laurie, Kumpaya Girgaba, Ngamaru Bidu, Mabel Warkarta, Nola Taylor, Thelma Judson, Marjorie Yates, Dulcie Gibbs, Yuwali Janice Nixon, Rosie Williams, Nora Nangapa, Bugai Whylouter, Nora Wompi, Jakayu Biljabu, Sarah Brooks, Noreena Kadibil, Yikartu Bunba, Lily Long, Renette Biljabu, Dadda Samson

Art Centre(s): Martumili Artists

Media Description: This photo was taken on a trip to Kunkun during which senior women performed songs and dances relating to this important women's site. A number of young boys also performed a boys' dance at Kunkun, preceding the women's dance and were sent away before they began.

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Culture Centre, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Hayley Atkins

 

Hayley Atkins - curating experience [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Hayley Atkins talks at length about her experience curating the Yiwarra Kuju exhibition. She talks about things she has learned, and also about her favourite paintings.

Date: 2009-11-18
Art centre(s): CSR Project, Martumili Artists
Language spoken: English
Catalogue number: CSROH_212_Hayley_Atkins
Date: 2009-11-18
Location Recorded: Old Halls Creek
Latitude/Longitude: -18.251269/127.782303

Cultural Protocols: Public Access
Access: Public
Full transcript: Carly Davenport: Hayley you were actually the first emerging curator working on the whole project, and you started back in Well 36, that trip in 2007. Do you want to talk a little bit about what this trip was like for you working with Martumilli artists and all of this team? Hayley Atkins: Yeah, when I first ... CD: Ooh ... Nicole Ma: What? CD: Microphone. NM: Oh! NM: Thank you, okay. CD: So yeah, so do you wanna start talking about the Well 36 Return to Country trip? HA: Before that ... Gabreille told me about the stock route, and I was sayin’ to Gabrielle, ‘what is the stock route?’ [laughs]. She said, Well 33 is one of them, it starts from Wiluna to Halls Creek, and I was thinkin’ yep, I wanted to go check it out. They ... Gabrielle told me if I could work on the stock route project ... so I said yes! But still you know ... I was thinking in my head, I didn’t know what the stock route was ... yeah, and finally we made it to 33, and we went bit further to Well 34 then 35, then we all met there. And I get to [XX - ?] and ... me with all the other artists too. Then we all got introduced and that’s where ... when JJ Jefferey James was alive then, he introduced me to all the old people and to all the mob and told me that I was connected to them as well, and JJ was saying ‘this is your granddaughter’ to the old people [laughs], and I was excited too ‘cause I didn’t know. From there, that’s where I learnt how to paint as well, with the old people. These old people was just painting and reading out a lot of stories, a lotta things I didn’t know, like the background of the bushman days, and that’s where I didn’t know that my grandmother Milly Kelly, I didn’t know she used to live up Widjimung [?] lake. Even my dad and mum, my grandparents, they come from the bush as well. So all these stories was just coming and I was just getting excited to know ... I just wanted to really go in deep to the Canning Stock Route Project. CD: So Martumilli Artists have got one of the biggest mobs of the whole exhibition, the whole project. HA: Yeah Martumilli have like worked with six communities, and there’s a lot of artists, even young people, and most of them paint, they, where they come from, and yeah. CD: That means more hard work from you [laughs], keeping up with the mob. HA: Mmm. CD: Hayley, do you wanna talk a little bit about some, I guess good memories, or highlights about what you’ve learnt along the way? Like with working with all the Martumilli artists in that group and then travelling the whole length of the stock route that way, and working with Wally Caruana, working with Monique and John and me ... what’s some of the good memories of the last few years, that you’ve ... HA: [sighs and smiles] CD: Too much? HA: Mmm ... good memories was like travelling on the Stock Road, and even actually seeing the spots and the stories and hearing from the old people, they actually showing you where it happened and where they was walkin’ around ... Even I learn a lot with Wally, like how does stories and the painting really connect and how you have to always like make them sit together, with the colours and the stories, yeah that’s the part I like, I learnt, like ‘cause I didn’t know anything about painting and even the stories when I started working with Martumilli. Gabrielle told me ‘oh you know, when you start working with Canning Stock Route Project, and I was thinkin’, ‘no I don’t wanna work ‘cause I don’t know anything’, but I just want to work so I can just go out there and know everything like painting and stories, I was doing it so it was like a journey for me, like knowing the families and the stories so I was just so proud to be on this project and that’s where I ... I learned how to paint so, the first painting was about my Stock Route painting [laughs]. NM: What was it of, that painting? HA: It was where ... the Seven Sisters were ... um Well 36. Where there was the water, the Seven Sisters created and the men lying down next to it, that’s what I painted. And we got bogged, me and Gabrielle. Another painting was ... Braden Pool, where we had the lunch, we had a lunch there. And ... CD: We hear she got bogged. HA: Another painting, we were sleeping at Well 35, and I painted the Seven Sisters in the sky, like stars. CD: Hayley why do you think it’s so important to listen to the old people? HA: Because they, they know everything, they know the bush life. They got this knowledge, they know the Dreaming and boundaries, everything. They lived that life. Like, it’s changed now ‘cause they all living in a town, and a house. But, so it’s a bit different from living in a town and living out in the bush. Yeah. So it’s good for people, whitefella, whitefellas and young people like us to know the connection and everything, to know that we all just connected no matter what language, different language we speak, but we just one family. CD: From that ... putting that exhibition together, that big special group with everyone contributing. What do you think’s been the most special for you in learning how that show’s gonna work together and sit together? HA: The exhibition itself, like, he tells many stories big and small and by the looks of the exhibition right now it’s, you can already see it ... all the connection, like ... like how Canning, made all the wells ... straight line, it’s like he put a scratch mark or scar through that stock road. It was like for Aboriginal people living the desert life it was good, until Canning went through there, now the people and the story line, their history is where people just got scattered, went different ways and it’s all coming back now for people to see what really happened and the stories all coming back. How it was back then. Like they were living their life singing and dancing through the law, that’s what was precious to them back then and families and connections, they ... um ... waterholes, Dreaming, everything, it was all theirs, and they want to tell the whole world it’s still theirs, you know, and it’s always been theirs since, and it’s good that they ... it’s good that people painting and everything it’s all in there for the other people to know, yeah so, so they could never forget where they come from. Yeah. CD: That old man that passed away he was the real big leader wasn’t he, from Kunawarritji? HA: Yeah he was, I didn’t really wanted him to go, ‘cause it was a bit too early ‘cause he know all the families belong to my grandfather, from [XX - ?]. CD: I mean you know first hand better than anyone because Martumilli Artists have so strongly wanted this project to happen, and that’s why we’ve got so many artists. Do you wanna talk about how you’ve worked with the elders guiding you and what we’re doing in that trip we just did all across the communities? And even now I guess, but even more I guess with your Country too and you making sure they’re happy and ... HA: Um yeah, people that I worked with Martumilli the biggest mob, we have the biggest mob of all the people, mostly they paint sometimes Canning Stock Router, ‘cause they were walking around through there getting contact with the white people for the first time, and they just love to paint and tell their stories, they want people to know about the bushman days. Even the bush tuckers and how they camped, many things been happening, even funny stories [laughs]. And so when I talk to them they talk non-stop and I feel excited when I’m with the old people ‘cause you get a lot out of them and they can teach you a lot of things, even how to sing and dance. CD: And you reckon they’re really keen to let all the [XX - ?] and young ones to know all about this too? HA: Yeah, that’s why they work so hard, they paint and just want the people to know, like get it out there to them, and they can get familiar with all the names of the place. Yeah, but I get really into them, like I really wanna know where they come from and the family tree as well. CD: What’s it been like working with Terry and Louise? HA: [Smiles] It was fantastic ‘cause, Terry and Louise know more than me, how to work, like, when I started first working, I didn’t really know much, but now I just know. So um, yeah we work really good. CD: And you have a bit of fun? HA: Yeah, so we get along just fine [laughs]. CD: And what about say working with Nola and Tom in different ways, different places? HA: Yeah with Nola ... working with her like, she helped me a lot. ‘Cause I don’t speak much of Manyjilyjarra I just, I can listen right, I can understand it a little, but not those hard words, so that’s why I wanted Nola to come in. But first, when I worked with this project, ‘cause too much was coming into my head, like all this screaming, you know, I was bit uncomfortable. Like, this is a big thing you know, could ... get in trouble, so, that’s why I asked if Nola could come on board and work with us, and check with the every old people to check if they want to work and story to be told. But actually everybody likes it and yeah there was no concern, only some stuff. So, yeah that’s good I got Nola on the board. And, Tom they really good. CD: What do you reckon of this Kimberley trip so far? We’ve still got to go to Balgo and Mulan. HA: Yeah, I’m lookin’ forward to meetin’ all the people there, ‘cause like, I’m connected to Wompi and Kumpaya and I like to go there and meet people and to know like, how people connected to that way. Yeah, it’s good to know, it good to meet a lot of people I like on this trip, and it’s just good to go and show them the exhibition and talk to them where everything is, so they’re happy CD: What’s the most important thing for you that you’ve learnt along this journey? HA: Mmm ... everything really. Mmm, the Country itself and the people, yeah and the history about it and to get to know other people as well [nods[].Mmmm, get to meet them, especially to get to know the artists, yeah, get to meet all the people ‘cause they know, they know people from where I came and yeah, there’s like this connection everywhere, no matter where you go, or how far you go, yeah. CD: What do you reckon of all of us working towards that big party opening in Canberra at the National Museum next year? HA: [smiles] I can’t wait actually, it’s gonna be good fun, yeah um, I will be there, everybody will be there, like, coming together, you know, one people. No matter where we come from, you know, everybody has a story to tell. CD: That’s gonna be a lot of hard work, especially the curator and multimedia mob. HA: Yeah. CD: There gonna be physically building that show in. HA: I can’t wait for that actually, I just wanna be there and can’t stop thinkin’ about it. Yeah, lookin’ forward. NM: There’s a lot of different things to do with the show, a lot of stories and Country and languages, and a lot of people will also be coming to see the show, some people will know alot and some people won’t know anything. So what would you ... what would be the one thing that you would hope that people will take from it, or get out of the show, from seeing the show? HA: To understand the boundaries and know the sacred places and you have to be there with like, going into that Country you have to take a owner, who know that Country and talk that language and ... to understand that we just all connected through our skin colours and that Aboriginal people respect their Dreaming and ... yeah, to respect some sacred sites, and just to – this is who we are as Aboriginal person, you know, this is how they been living, and to just learn about the history and what did happen on the Stock Road it happen, so, just to learn about the past and just to ... yeah just to learn about the history itself, and yeah. NM: That first thing you said about boundaries, why do you think that it’s important to learn about that? HA: ‘Cause, boundaries is like going into somebody’s country. And you have to take a person who know that country, like you don’t just drive past it and go to any rock, hills, or water, there could be sacred sites there, and anything could happen to you. CD: So people respect the guarding mob they gotta respect the Aboriginal way knowledge, when they come into Aboriginal country? HA: Yeah, so hopefully when you driving out, and wanna check out the desert without anyone knowing, so you need to take somebody that knows that Country. NM: What would you say to someone, who says you know, ‘I’ve got a map – I’ve got a Canning Map, you know, I know where I’m going, I don’t need anyone’. HA: As long as they just stick to the road – the Stock Road. If you just drive anywhere, like anything can happen. Like these are some sacred places. NM: So do you think this exhibition will help them understand that a little bit, that there’s a lot of little things going on around there. HA: Yeah. NM: Not just that it’s one road, that they just drive up and down? CD: Hayley what do you think about the title, the new title that Martu mob have offered to all the other mobs, that could be our title? HA: Yeah. CD: Do you wanna say it, like tell the audience what that title is? HA: Yeah, that title is Yiwarra Kuju – it’s mean One Road. And it came from the Manyjilyjarra word, so but we got nine art centres and nine language, that’s big, because all the language group, yeah, we have to try and talk about that title, and which title we can have for the exhibition. So, we asked Martumili mob, so they came up with that word. So I guess, hope, they are happy with that. CD: Do you like the title? HA: Mmm ... yep – and I hope other people like it too. CD: [XX - ?] HA: Yeah. Yeah, they make sense ‘cause it’s just one road, not any other road. So – it’s one road – but many people got stories for it. CD: Hayley, what’s your favourite part of the exhibition, what section or theme do you like working with? HA: Seven Sisters. CD: Can you talk about maybe the artist names that are in there? HA: [XX - ?], [XX - ?], Nancy Chapman, [XX - ?], big Seven Sister painting from three sisters, and Nan’s painting. CD: and why do you like Seven sisters so much, coz that was your first painting as well? HA: Yeah it was, the story about Seven Sisters, that one man was chasing seven girls and wanted to make them wife, but they didn’t like him, and that Seven Sisters story go right through to South Australia and Northern Territory, so it’s a huge story for Seven Sisters. And they created a lot of water and a lot of places, so that’s how I like it. CD: Good. NM: Very Good. CD: Beautiful. NM: Thankyou. CD: Thanks Hayley. CD: It’ll be good when Gabrielle watches that one day, she’ll be so stoked. HA: Yeah, I wanna go back home, and do painting – second one – with you on the phone (laughs) – Gabrielle wanted me to do that – she liked it. NM: What painting’s that? HA: And I really liked it too. CD: She made a special one ... HA: I’s tryna keep it for you. CD: Of me on a satellite phone [laughs]. HA: With that jeans! [points] CD: With these jeans? HA: Yeah! Tryna paint that clothes too. HA: It was very nice. HA: Yeah. NM: Which of the paintings is in the show? HA: Nothing. CD: No. NM: Or we can put it in the ... HA: Book? NM: Signature piece? You know that interactive. CD: Mmmm – well a couple of Hayley’s one in particular would be the Tinka, Gabrielle in the swag, you in the swag in the starry night – that would be a wonderful one for ... HA: Gabrielle got that painting on her wall. CD: She owns that one yeah. HA: I been ask for ... I wanted them painting back – [laughs] but it was too late and I seen them hanging in headland [laughs] And I think that other one, they sold. NM: What about the one that was [XX - ?] HA: I dunno, must of Gabrielle got it. NM: She got that one too? HA: She got it too and one woman got it from Adelaide. CD: See, if that National Museum had of got on board earlier, they all would of been kept together, but at least we got the best of the best in. END
Video format: DVD/MiniDV/Quicktime movie
Video recording: 107 Kimberley Approvals, Louise, Hayley IVs, Nov 09
Source: CSROH_212_Hayley_Atkins
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Hayley Atkins; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Hayley Atkins

Hayley Atkins - favourite painting, history of the Canning Stock Route [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Hayley Atkins talks about Patrick Tjungurrayi's paintings and his story for travelling through that country.

Date: 2008-10-30
Art centre(s): Martumili Artists
Language spoken: English
Catalogue number: CSROH_186_Hayley_Atkins
Date: 2008-10-30
Location Recorded: National Museum of Australia, Canberra
Latitude/Longitude: -35.291492/149.117931

Cultural Protocols: Public Access
Access: Public
Full transcript: [Hayley talks about Patrick's painting. Holds it up]

Hayley Atkins: This painting belong to Patrick Olodoodi and … where he from? This Patrick Olodoodi’s painting and he painted all the wells from Well 33 to Well 51, his story about his journey on the Canning Stock Route and the story is of when he was travelling and all the camps … all the people, where they was all camping and he walked past through there, visiting all the families. And, how he seen the place with … the place was alive and the people were alive, before white people made a well, the Canning Stock Route. And how he was telling the story the people was happy and alive and just doing their own thing, like travelling, visiting families, everywhere and they was all connected through the area through Canning Stock Route. And meeting up with different language group and meeting up for ceremony and when the Canning Stock Route, they made through there, how it all separated all the people and a lot of killing and massacre was happening and … the cave he was talking about where he was, but actually he wasn’t there, he went on his journey to Well 50 and around somewhere Well 40 there was a lot of killing, like a lot of people been dying, and he went there and seen a lot of people was dead and seen no life was there, looking at all the people and … so he travelled back ‘cause all the people was dead and he said a story on the trip, we’ve got a video camera of him, how he said it. So that’s his story, how he seen the Canning Stock Route. So he travelled right back to Unduwa [?], just walking a long way.

END
Video format: DVD/MiniDV/Quicktime movie
Video recording: Tape 46
Source: CSROH_186_Hayley_Atkins
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Hayley Atkins; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Murungkurr Terry Murray, Hayley Atkins, Doolmarria Louise Mengil

 

Murungkurr Terry Murray, Hayley Atkins, Doolmarria Louise Mengil - curating the Beijing send-off [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Murungkurr Terry Murray, Hayley Atkins, and Doolmarria Louise Mengil discuss the process of selecting works and curating the show for the Beijing send-off at the Perth Town Hall in 2008.

Date: 2008-06-13
Art centre(s): CSR Project, Martumili Artists
Language spoken: English
Catalogue number: CSROH_197_Murunkurr_Terry_Murray_Hayley_Atkins_Doolmarria_Louise_Mengil
Date: 2008-06-13
Location Recorded: William Street, Northbridge
Latitude/Longitude: -31.95/115.85

Cultural Protocols: Public Access
Access: Public
Full transcript: [Can you describe the process of how you selected the paintings?] Doolmarria Louise Mengil: First of all we went, all three if us, as well as Wally assisting us, go through a whole lot of paintings and picked out most of our star paintings, which are the strongest paintings within the show, and we managed to pick out twenty odd works I think it was. Then we decide how it was going to look on the wall as well as the story, how it would interact and how we were going to put it up. Have you got anything to add to that Terry or Hayley? [What happened during the day?] LM: As the mini-launch exhibition for Beijing? We got to see the paintings for the first time stretched and our job for that day was to actually set up the exhibition and to give sort of an insight to the Australians and what it’s going to look like over in Beijing. It was a very long day. [How did you work out how to hang the paintings?] Murungkurr Terry Murray: Yeah, Hayley and Louise and I were trying to figure out how to make it really strong and eye catching to the public, and how it’s going to be hanging in Beijing. So it was, yeah, all day yesterday trying to put the balance of work, you know, from the nine different art centre about twenty artists and three big collaborative works, so it was … yeah, the help of Wally assisting. And just trying to make it really strong, how it’s going to be hanging in Beijing. [Can you explain the snake?] TM: Oh like, what Wally was saying about you can’t have the small work and a medium sized work and a large work because you call it the wedge, wedgie … from our mentor and overall curator was giving us a bit of insight on trying to make every work balanced and trying to make the show large work, medium work … balance of work, how to. LM: Give the audience basically a rhythm to what the works … how they sit on the wall. The colour difference as well, I mean you’ve got some paintings which have really dark, dull colours but are also strong, and then you’ve got these beautiful bright pink and purple and stunning bright colours that really bounce at you, so you’re trying to … it was really, really hard, I mean we’re trying to put all these paintings to sit with each other and most of them were very colourful, but then we had to balance it out and also have a special rhythm to the wall so we didn’t have audience getting bored, and making sure that we didn’t have two paintings with the same story on the wall, so it was a long process. Hayley Atkins: And how the painting all sits together. [Was it a bit stressful? Was there tension between you?] TM: Well, every time I wanted to hang a work, the girls started to complain and they had to bring it down and we had to try and … and I was asking them first and saying, ‘oh well it’s up to you’, but I was just pulling works and trying to … you know when you look through the gallery space, the entrance, you had to have the balance of work and the outside wall had to have that even line of … strength of how the colours, you know Louise was saying, the colours and the storyline. But, yeah, it turned out alright and we had to show the peace [piece?]. LM: Oh Hayley and I were okay, we were pretty much laid back. But then, like, as the day got later and we didn’t have all the works in place, it was really, really hard, it was very stressful then, wasn’t it? And then ‘cause we had short time as well to go and get ready and come back, so it was more of really tension, concentrating a bit more and … I call it the backbreaking, it was really hard, but we managed, we got together and we managed to get through it and … it turned out to be a stunning little exhibition. [How did you feel when you first walk in?] LM: Relieved and overwhelmed. I don’t know how you guys felt bu t… I thought it was amazing and just to see what it looks like there, I mean it’s not even a quarter of what we’re going to really hang, so to see those paintings hang beautifully in a space where it wasn’t much of a space is going to be amazing in the National Museum of Canberra in 2010, with all the other art works. How do you guys feel? HA: I feel really happy ‘cause how we worked really hard and played with all the paintings and putting it all together, and trying our best to make it work out and stand out. It worked. TM: I was, yeah, really fulfilled that throughout this project we are working as curators as Louise and Hayley and I had to hang the works, and when the gallery space was full, you know like most of these organisations and a lot of other … BHP sponsor and a lot of Government sponsor and people who are coming to the exhibition, had said who hang the show, who was involved in it? Yeah, they were really surprised to see us coming from different organisations, different art backgrounds, and how the young curator team and they were really excited that we were involved … with the FORM team. And yeah, I was really pleased about all those work we were hanging, and really gave their own strength. But it, you know, it’s just a quarter of the works that are going to Beijing, but the next two years we are still working on the bigger picture of this Canning Stock Route. [Were you surprised at how they looked stretched?] LM: Not so surprised, more excited. I mean, we always knew that they were going to be a beautiful piece in the end, but just excited to see exactly what they were going to look like when they were stretched, and they looked stunning. And, I must say, the vibe that we had within the exhibition was awesome. I mean it was very hard in hanging the paintings and, not only we had assistance with Wally but we also had assistance with the paintings, the art works. I mean, if it wasn’t the art works that were so strong it would have been too hard to be able to hang something and being able to have some art work a bit stronger than the others sort of played it all out as well. [How did you feel talking to people? Listening to speeches?] TM: Well for me I was, yeah, I was relaxed and just … had a good time and, like … like the young curating team, what we were saying, and Wally speaking on behalf of FORM and the Canning Stock Route Project was really … really excited that, yeah, I’m part of the team. LM: I was happy and moved. By the speeches as well as just … just about everything, the vibes, the hang, but most of all the speeches put the icing on the cake basically. TM: And yeah, Hayley had to steal the show because … yeah, just standing in front of everyone and I was really … really praising her on because I was just … you know, Hayley and I and Louise we’re on the ground with all this nine art centre and coming from … coming from a different organisation and expressing what we do, like, on the ground and professionally in hanging all this work, it’s come a long way and we have to show that we are part of history and part of what we do in our profession. [Hayley, how did you come up with the speech? (They talk about it)] HA: As I was on this Canning Stock Route trip and I learn a lot of things from old people that was talking to me and telling me all these Dreamtime stories and … ‘cause I didn’t know, I don’t know what they was painting and I didn’t know anything really ... I was learning from them. And, learning how they survived in the desert and dancing and keeping their culture strong and I wanted to tell the audience about that, our background, Aboriginal people and how we related to that land. They painting stories about their great, great grandfather’s Country, their dreaming and keeping it strong and important to the younger generation, like us. I was happy to get up and talk for the whole nine art centres because we all in one talking about the canning stock route. [Talking about Hayley’s ‘one voice’ line] LM: Yeah, we all come together and have one big voice, carry one big voice. That was mind blowing, yeah, that was amazing. But you could tell it wasn’t a speech written up, you could tell it was deeper than that, it was something … you could tell her connection within the art centres, within the people and … it’s great that she was able to do it because there was no one else I’d rather actually … I would rather Hayley or Terry had the speech, I wouldn’t have wanted to do the speech ‘cause I’m actually learning from these two as well to how their traditional old people lived on their Country, it’s completely different to my background and it is great that she got up and spoke. It shows where she’s coming from. [Terry talking about the team and Beijing] LM: Watch out Beijing. TM: I like to say something. How the curating team and the camera crew team, I think it’s started to get stronger throughout from last year to 2010, to where the bigger picture’s gonna be even more stronger in our minds and our hearts are going to grow with this project and it’s going to be mind-blowing. And the Beijing Olympics is just a … LM: Tip of an iceberg TM: A little piece of the puzzle that’s going to bring wider audience to the bigger picture, but it is gonna be, history’s gonna speak for itself and the team is gonna get more stronger. And everybody else is gonna shout! LM: Actually there is one more thing terry, we didn’t acknowledge Tom [Putuparri Tom Lawford], he also assisted us. I mean, not all of us knew stories about each paintings and he assisted us with putting labels up to the right paintings, so that was the most important part as well. So thank you Tom. HA: And thanks everybody. END
Video format: DVD/MiniDV/Quicktime movie
Video recording: Tape 37
Source: CSROH_197_Murunkurr_Terry_Murray_Hayley_Atkins_Doolmarria_Louise_Mengil
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Murungkurr Terry Murray, Hayley Atkins, Doolmarria Louise Mengil; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Name: Hayley Atkins

Hayley Atkins - background and the CSR Project [ORAL HISTORY]


Synopsis: Hayley Atkins speaks about her background, her involvement in this curators' meeting and where paintings sit in relation to Country. Hayley discusses the strength of works, her favourite painting and why she began painting herself on the Canning Stock Route Project. Hayley also speaks about her work at Martumili Artists and how she wants to learn more so she can go back and teach others.

Date: 2008-04-12
Art centre(s):
Language spoken: English
Catalogue number: CSROH_185_Hayley_Atkins
Interviewed By: Clint Dixon
Location Recorded: Old Masonic Hall, Nedlands
Latitude/Longitude: -31.98/115.8

Cultural Protocols: Public Access - Verbal Consent
Access: Public
Full transcript: Clint Dixon: Can you introduce yourself?

Hayley Atkins: My name Hayley Atkins and I’m a Jungala and I’m from Jigalong community. But … I’m Hayley Atkins and I’m a Jungala and I’m from Jigalong.

CD: And how old are you?

HA: Twenty-five.

CD: What's different from the last curators meeting to this one?

HA: This one is … the second one is different ‘cause we had to match the paintings together, to come on the wall, how to look and match the colours and the shapes and strong paintings.

CD: How did you plan this curators meeting?

HA: We planned it … how to stand on the wall and to match other paintings, smaller paintings.

CD: Can you explain how you plan the CSR paintings?

HA: We rolled out a long paper and started drawing a long line and started to write the wells, like from 1-51 Well, and then we started putting all the Art Centres and put all the paintings there next to it, next to art centres and the painting … what number well they was painting, putting all the paintings to match the wells.

CD: So to get a better understanding of where all those nine art centres and language groups?

HA: Yeah, yeah, and which well they painted, and which story goes to which well.

[Nicole says they’re running out of battery on one of the cameras]

CD: Can you say your name, where you come from and what your background is?

HA: Hey I’ve gotta turn this phone off, somebody could ring me.

CD: What have you learnt since the last curators meeting?

HA: Um … I learnt that … choosing all the paintings, and we had to pick which one was a good painting, and which one was strong and good stories, and which one was weak and wasn’t standing out properly.

CD: Was it hard to choose the paintings?

HA: At first it was easy ‘cause we knew which painting was strong and which painting wasn’t standing out and … yeah.

CD: So you Terry and Louise had the same idea?

HA: Yeah, at the first … first meeting we came down here.

CD: Out of the 100 plus paintings, how many are left?

HA: We went down to eighty paintings.

CD: Are you still trying to reduce the number of paintings?

HA: Um … we just picked fifteen paintings, or, I think twenty, twenty-two, that we’re trying to put it down for an exhibition in Beijing.

CD: Is that your favourite painting behind you? Can you talk about it?

HA: Yeah. She’s a … her name is Mulyatingki Marney and she live out in Kunumu community and in two places and in Kunawarritji, that’s on the Canning Stock Route, Well 33, and she’s an old woman, old lady, who paints her Country and paints her stories about her life and her family, and what was really happening out there in the desert.

CD: What sort of style is it?

HA: Um … she have her own styles of ways she paints and she always paints dot paintings, ‘cause this is her traditional way, and … what am I gonna say? Um …

CD: Was it hard choosing your favourite five?

HA: No, it was easy, it was hard, but I just picked five paintings because I liked it and I like how they paint, plus it’s got a strong story as well, and meaning.

CD: Can you tell me about your paintings?

HA: Um, that’s my first painting that I paint and that painting of when we went on the Canning Stock Route project and I was working with old people, collecting all the paints, mixing paint for them and giving my canvas out to them and … I kind of seen all my family and all my people sitting there and painting and I was thinking to myself I’m missing out on the good opportunity, plus I went out there to learn to … how to paint, do painting and learn some stories and history about that place, whereas I didn’t know any history.

Yeah um … we went on this, oh … I seen old people and middle-aged woman painting so I seen myself wasn’t doing anything. We had biggest mob people there painting and I was the only person that was walking around and helping, so I felt something ‘cause I seen myself as an Aboriginal person not doing painting, like I needed to learn something and to learn history and stories and what they painting. So I just got a canvas and people started telling me, ‘go on just paint, paint, do painting your way, how you want to paint, as long as you can learn from us, see how we painting’. I was thinking really hard, and I just painted the hills, what I was looking around, I looked around I seen hills and trees, then my boss told me … just paint where we got bogged. And I thought I’ll paint that so that was my first painting.

CD: So what was the story behind it? With the car and trailer?

HA: The trailer, it had my nanna and me and some other people were there, like Dadda Samson and Lily Long. It was going along in the track, we got bogged and we had a trailer behind with a lot of food and stuff, and we got stuck and the biggest mob of Toyotas was behind us, so everyone had to get out and help us and we just couldn’t get it out, and the old people started saying we stuck, you know, we’re gonna stay here. Yeah.

CD: Any bad experiences during the CSR project?

HA: Yeah, we … going on the Canning Stock Route was … you need a … new Land Cruiser plus spare tyres and a lot of food and water – ‘cause you out there in the desert and no hospital, no help out there. But as long as there’s Toyotas going past there, tourists and … plus you need a lot of water. Some wells got clean water, drinking water. And we, on that trip we broke down a spring brake underneath, so lucky we had all our bush mechanics out there. They was fixing … they broke the branch and started chopping it, they tie it up in this … made it as a … hold it, so they fixed it and we just packed up and kept going.

CD: What have been the fun moments?

HA: The fun part was getting to the best painting, choosing the best, outstanding painting that stand on its own, like, brings out the bright colours from the painting and plus stories too.

CD: Any funny stories about the crew?

HA: Yeah, it’s … the first curators, yeah emerging curators’ meeting was, it was like a few people, but on the second one it’s like we all here. And it’s been fun too. And we all working together and …

CD: Can you tell me about John Carty's song?

HA: Yeah, yeah. Yeah, John Carty made a song, made a funny song, and making a joke out of the song and making it funny as well and made us all laugh.

CD: What was the song about?

HA: [Laughs]

CD: What do you want to get out of this project?

HA: Yeah. Yeah. I’d like to learn more and more other stuff so I can go back and teach others, because when I go back I work at school as well, with kids, with painting. And … getting more experience.

CD: Can you tell me about your work?

HA: My work … I work for the Martumili Art Centre in Newman and we work for six communities, Kunawarritji, Punmu, Jigalong, and Parnpajinya, and all our office is based in Newman. And, in Newman we pack everything like paints and canvas, we make canvas there, and we take it out to the six communities and when they finish they send it back to us, we catalogue it, take a picture of it and some goes to the gallery and some we sell there. The rough and ready work we sell there in Newman every August, festival time, and basket, some we keep for exhibitions. And … the other place I work at is the school with kids, I paint with kids, learning them what to paint and how to paint and what colour to use.

CD: When you're curating, what do you look for in a painting?

HA: We look for a … um …. a painting that stands out on the wall. Yeah, strong story and … yeah. Strong story and strong painting with light colours and colour that shines, bright up the room.

CD: Anything else you'd like to add?

HA: [Doesn’t add anything further]

END


Video recording: Tape 13, Tape 14
Source: CSROH_185_Hayley_Atkins
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Hayley Atkins; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Untitled

Artist(s): Hayley Atkins

Art Centre(s): Martumili Artists
Size: 45x45
Medium: acrylic on linen

Location depicted: Jarntu (Well 35)
Place of creation: Well 46
Latitude/Longitude: -20.64184/126.28722

Artwork copyright: ©2013 Hayley Atkins
Catalogue ID: HA/92/MM
Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on use

Photographer: Tim Acker
Photograph date: 2008-06-15
Photography copyright: FORM
Format: Image
Category: Artwork

Artist(s) biography:
Hayley grew up in Jigalong in Martu Country and lives in Newman, where she works with Martumili Artists. Hayley has been involved with the Canning Stock Route Project since 2007 and was its first curator. While supporting the artists on the ‘return to Country’ trip at Well 36, Hayley began painting herself. She also began to learn about her own family ties to artists from many other Western Desert art centres. Hayley loves working with her elders and learning about their lives in the bush. Hayley is also an artist featured in the Canning Stock Route collection.

Accession ID: 20131011_FORM_MIRA_B0044_0075

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Me and Milly Camping 36

Artist(s): Hayley Atkins

Date created: 2007
Art Centre(s): Martumili Artists
Size: 79x53
Medium: acrylic on linen

Place of creation: Well 46
Latitude/Longitude: -20.64184/126.28722

Artwork copyright: ©2013 Hayley Atkins
Catalogue ID: HA/93/MM
Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on use

Photographer: Tim Acker
Photograph date: 2007-08-06
Photography copyright: FORM
Format: Image
Category: Artwork

Artist(s) biography:
Hayley grew up in Jigalong in Martu Country and lives in Newman, where she works with Martumili Artists. Hayley has been involved with the Canning Stock Route Project since 2007 and was its first curator. While supporting the artists on the ‘return to Country’ trip at Well 36, Hayley began painting herself. She also began to learn about her own family ties to artists from many other Western Desert art centres. Hayley loves working with her elders and learning about their lives in the bush. Hayley is also an artist featured in the Canning Stock Route collection.

Accession ID: 20131011_FORM_MIRA_B0044_0076

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Me, Gabrielle and Milly got bogged

Artist(s): Hayley Atkins

Art Centre(s): Martumili Artists
Size: 76 x 38 cm
Medium: acrylic on linen

Place of creation: Well 36
Latitude/Longitude: -22.13954/125.28315

Artwork copyright: ©2013 Hayley Atkins
Catalogue ID: HA/54/MM
Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on use

Photographer: Tim Acker
Photograph date: 2008-06-15
Photography copyright: FORM
Format: Image
Category: Artwork

Artist(s) biography:
Hayley grew up in Jigalong in Martu Country and lives in Newman, where she works with Martumili Artists. Hayley has been involved with the Canning Stock Route Project since 2007 and was its first curator. While supporting the artists on the ‘return to Country’ trip at Well 36, Hayley began painting herself. She also began to learn about her own family ties to artists from many other Western Desert art centres. Hayley loves working with her elders and learning about their lives in the bush. Hayley is also an artist featured in the Canning Stock Route collection.

Accession ID: 20131011_FORM_MIRA_B0044_0047

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Hayley Atkins

Language Group(s): Kartujarra
Community: Jigalong, Newman
Art Centre(s): Martumili Artists
CSR Project role: Emerging Aboriginal curator, artist

Biography: Hayley grew up in Jigalong in Martu Country and lives in Newman, where she works with Martumili Artists. Her language group is Kartujarra. Hayley has been involved with the Canning Stock Route Project since 2007 and was its first curator. While supporting the artists on the ‘return to Country’ trip at Well 36, Hayley began painting herself. She also began to learn about her own family ties to artists from many other Western Desert art centres. Hayley loves working with her elders and learning about their lives in the bush. Hayley is also an artist featured in the Canning Stock Route collection.

Photographer: Tim Acker
Photograph date: 2007
Photography copyright: © FORM
Format: Image
Source: 7 CSR Trip 5-6 August 07
Category: People
Accession ID: 20131016_FORM_MIRA_B0090_0022

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

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