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Morika Biljabu

Women at Kunkun

Artists Nora Wompi, Bugai Whylouter, Kumpaya Girgaba and Nyangapa Nora Nangapa in front of the Kunkun windmill. Martumili artists painting and weaving workshop at Kunawarritji (Well 33) and Kunkun, April 2008.

Date created: 4/18/2008
Photographer: Morika Biljabu
Location: Kunkun, near Well 33
Latitude/Longitude: -22.3418/124.7752

People: Nora Wompi, Bugai Whylouter, Kumpaya Girgaba, Nyangapa Nora Nangapa
Art Centre(s): Martumili Artists, CSR Project

Copyright: Morika Biljabu
Format: Image
Category: Image
Source: Morika Favourites
Accession ID: 20130925_FORM_MIRA_B0032_0077

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Kunawarritji workshop, 2008

Location: Kunawarritji, Well 33

Date: 2008

Event Description: In April 2008 a big mob of Martumili artists travelled out to Kunawarritji (Well 33) and Kunkun for a week long series of painting and weaving workshops. Celebrated fibre artist Nalda Searles facilitated the weaving workshops, and some of the paintings produced at Kunawarritji are now considered 'hero' works in the National Museum of Australia's Canning Stock Route collection. Martu photographer Morika Biljabu documented these workshops and a number of her images were published in the Weekend Australian Magazine in the feature article 'On the Whitefellas Road' by Victoria Laurie.

People: Morika Biljabu, Victoria Laurie, Kumpaya Girgaba, Ngamaru Bidu, Mabel Warkarta, Nola Taylor, Thelma Judson, Marjorie Yates, Dulcie Gibbs, Yuwali Janice Nixon, Rosie Williams, Nora Nangapa, Bugai Whylouter, Nora Wompi, Jakayu Biljabu, Sarah Brooks, Noreena Kadibil, Yikartu Bunba, Lily Long, Renette Biljabu, Dadda Samson

Art Centre(s): Martumili Artists

Media Description: This photo was taken on a trip to Kunkun during which senior women performed songs and dances relating to this important women's site. A number of young boys also performed a boys' dance at Kunkun, preceding the women's dance and were sent away before they began.

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Culture Centre, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Canning Stock Route and Surrounding Country

Artist(s): Kumpaya Girgaba, Ngamayu Ngamaru Bidu, Mitutu Mabel Wakarta, Ngalangka Nola Taylor, Thelma Judson, Marjorie Yates, Jugarda Dulcie Gibbs, Yuwali Janice Nixon, Mantararr Rosie Williams, Nyangapa Nora Nangapa, Bugai Whylouter, Nora Wompi, Jakayu Biljabu, Morika Biljabu

Date created: 2008
Art Centre(s): Martumili Artists
Size: 292.3x129
Medium: acrylic on canvas

Artwork Story: Kumpaya Girgaba laid out the initial design for this painting, which all the artists collaboratively customised and elaborated. When the painting was nearing completion, Kumpaya called out the names of all the waterholes depicted here. This painting, which was produced by 14 women artists at Kunawarritji (Well 33), represents a stretch of Country crossed by the Canning Stock Route. It depicts a number of the waterholes that were made into wells, but many other permanent and ephemeral water sources are also included. When the Canning Stock Route was in use as a droving highway, many of the artists relied on these other waters to ensure their safe passage through this contested land.

Place of creation: Well 33

Artwork copyright: ©2013 Kumpaya Girgaba, Ngamayu Ngamaru Bidu, Mitutu Mabel Wakarta, Ngalangka Nola Taylor, Thelma Judson, Marjorie Yates, Jugarda Dulcie Gibbs, Yuwali Janice Nixon, Mantararr Rosie Williams, Nyangapa Nora Nangapa, Bugai Whylouter, Nora Wompi, Jakayu Biljabu, Morika Biljabu
Catalogue ID: KG/NB/MW/NT/TJ/MY/DG/JN/RW/NN/BW/NW/JB/MB/201/MM
Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on use

Photographer: Jason McCarthy
Photograph date: 2008-06-09
Photography copyright: National Museum of Australia
Format: Image
Category: Artwork

Artist(s) biography: Kumpaya Girgaba born about 1945 Manyjilyjarra language group, Karimarra skin group Parnngurr community Martumili Artists A respected law woman and cultural leader, Kumpaya was born near Kiwirrkurra and grew up around the Canning Stock Route. For many years her family avoided contact with Europeans, but eventually they moved to Jigalong mission to join their relatives. Kumpaya learned how to paint and weave baskets while visiting family in Balgo, Fitzroy Crossing and Patjarr. She is credited with introducing these skills to Martu people. Ngamayu Ngamaru Bidu born about 1950 Manyjilyjarra language group, Karimarra skin group Parnngurr community Martumili Artists Ngamayu grew up around Pitu. As a child, she encountered surveyor Len Beadell, who was grading roads near Well 22. He gave Ngamayu and her siblings fruit. Not realising that it was meant to be eaten raw, they cooked the fruit until it was completely dried up. After meeting Beadell, Ngamayu’s family was picked up at Parnngurr rock hole and taken to Jigalong. Mitutu Mabel Warkarta born about 1920 Warnman language group, Milangka skin group Parnngurr community Martumili Artists After Mabel’s mother and father died, she was ‘grown up’ by one of her aunts. She walked around Karlamilyi and Warnman Country, and when she was older she travelled with her promised husband. After walking into Jigalong, she worked on various cattle stations. Mabel married twice more after the death of her first husband. Ngalangka Nola Taylor senior translator and project adviser Nola works closely with Martumili Artists as a translator and adviser for Martu people. In 2007 she joined the ‘return to Country’ trip at Well 36. She has translated the majority of the Martu oral histories for the Canning Stock Route project. As a cultural mentor under the leadership of Martu elder, Kumpaya Girgaba, she has also provided guidance and support to curator Hayley Atkins, filmmaker Morika Biljabu and the whole project team. She has helped facilitate many trips in Martu Country. Nola is also an artist featured in the Canning Stock Route collection. Thelma Judson born about 1956 Manyjilyjarra language group, Milangka skin group Parnngurr community Martumili Artists Thelma was born in the Percival Lakes region and grew up around Yimiri and Kurturarra. In 1964 her family was one of the last Martu groups to leave the desert and be reunited with their families at Jigalong mission. After she left school, Thelma moved to Strelley station and married in Jigalong, where she had her children. Today she lives in Parnngurr with her husband, Yanjimi Peter Rowlands, and their children. Marjorie Yates born about 1950 Manyjilyjarra language group, Karimarra skin group Kunawarritji Community Martumili Artists Marjorie was married to senior Martu man Jeffrey James, who died in 2008. After establishing Kunawarritji community in the 1980s, she and her husband raised their children there. Marjorie lives at Kunawarritji today with her children and grandchildren. Jugarda Dulcie Gibbs born about 1947, died 2011 Manyjilyjarra language group, Milangka skin group Punmu and Kunawarritji communities Martumili Artists Dulcie grew up in the country between Kunawarritji and Yimiri. In 1957, after the death of her father at Karlamilyi (Rudall River), the family moved to Jigalong. With her sisters Muni Rita Simpson and Mantararr Rosie Williams, she returned to her Country at Punmu in 1982. She now lives in Kunawarritji with her husband, children and grandchildren. Yuwali Janice Nixon born about 1947 Manyjilyjarra, Mangala language groups, Purungu skin group Parnngurr community Martumili Artists Yuwali was born at Yulpu soak in the Percival Lakes. In 1964 her family group, which consisted only of women and children, tried to evade a native welfare patrol officer who was attempting to bring them in to Jigalong mission. This story is depicted in the book Cleared Out and the film Contact. Yuwali later worked on a number of stations, but finally moved closer to her Country in 1982 when she moved to Punmu. Mantararr Rosie Williams born about 1943 Manyjilyjarra, Mangala language groups, Milangka skin group Punmu community Martumili Artists Rosie was born at Kurupu, near Kurturarra in the Percival Lakes. After her father died at Karlamilyi (Rudall River), Rosie and her sisters, Jugarda Dulcie Gibbs and Muni Rita Simpson, met up with some Martu people who told them that their relatives were at Jigalong, and so they moved to the mission. In 1982 Rosie returned to her homelands at Punmu, where she lives today with her children and grandchildren. Nyangapa Nora Nangapa born about 1916 Manyjilyjarra language group, Karimarra skin group Kunawarritji community Martumili Artists I was born near Lipuru. We went from Lipuru to Wajaparni and Kilykily. They looked after me there as I grew. I went east … and kept on going towards Balgo, travelling with the drovers all the way. Nyangapa lives at Kunawarritji and travels regularly between Kunawarritji and Balgo. She paints for both Martumili and Warlayirti Artists, and many younger artists describe having learned to paint by watching her example. Bugai Whylouter born about 1945 Warnman, Kartujarra language groups, Purungu skin group Kunawarritji community Martumili Artists I saw whitefellas first time in Parnngurr. We were climbing up the hills [to get away]. Bugai was born at Balfour Downs and grew up around Kartarru (Well 24), Wantili (Well 25), Tiwa (Well 26) and Wuranu (Well 29). She travelled around Karlamilyi with her husband, and later with drovers on the stock route. In 1963 her family met surveyor Len Beadell, who was grading roads. They were taken to Jigalong. Nora Wompi born about 1935 Manyjilyjarra, Kukatja language groups, Nungurrayi skin group Kunawarritji and Balgo communities Martumili Artists Wompi was born with ‘pussycat’ (feral cat) Dreaming at Pingakurangu rock hole near Kunawarritji. As a young girl, she travelled north with the drovers to Billiluna and Balgo. Today she lives at Kunawarritji, but continues to travel regularly between Well 33 and Balgo, where she has many relatives. Wompi paints for both Warlayirti and Martumili art centres. Jakayu Biljabu born about 1937 Manyjilyjarra language group, Purungu skin group Punmu community Martumili Artists Jakayu was born near Pitu, east of Well 25, and grew up around Kunawarritji, Rarrki and Nyilangkurr, where her father died. In 1963, with her husband and extended family, she met the surveyor Len Beadell, who was grading roads for the Woomera rocket range. This meeting prompted them to join their relatives who were living at Jigalong mission. In 1982 Jakayu moved to Punmu community, where she lives today with her children and grandchildren. Morika Biljabu photographer and filmmaker Morika lives at Punmu in the heart of Martu Country. Her passion for her family and community inspires all of her film and photographic work. She joined the Canning Stock Route Project in 2007 for the ‘return to Country’ trip at Well 36. She recorded the artists’ workshops and produced a film featuring her grandmother, Jakayu Biljabu. In 2008 her photographs were published in the Weekend Australian magazine; that same year she held her first solo exhibition Ngayunpala Kujungka (We Are One).
Artwork Diagram: canning_stock_route_and_surrounding_country_various_detail

Accession ID: 20131014_FORM_MIRA_B0045_0071

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Mantararr Rosie Williams, Mulyatingki Marney, Jakayu Biljabu, Ngalangka Nola Taylor, Morika Biljabu

Martumili Artists - Minyipuru (Seven Sisters) [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: This is the Minyipuru (Seven Sisters) story, collected from Martumili artists in Punmu, 2009, and collated and transcribed by Monique La Fontaine.

Date: 2009-04
Art centre(s): Martumili Artists
Catalogue number: CSROH_287_Minyipuru
Date: 2009-04
Transcribed By: Monique La Fontaine
Location Recorded: Punmu
Latitude/Longitude: -22.042865/123.120883

Cultural Protocols: Public Access
Access: Public
Notes: This was recorded in transcript only by Monique La Fontaine asking Tom Lawford about the September 2008 Ngumpan workshop.
Full transcript: Minyipuru [Seven Sisters] story

The Martu story of the Seven Sisters originates in the Country around Roebourne and when they began travelling east on their long journey they were many more than seven. The Minyipuru were a big group of ladies including many sisters and mothers. At various places on their journey they lost members of their group until eventually only seven sisters remained.

This is the story told by Martu women, although in their words, ‘there are other stories for other sides’. Many different people have stories for Minyipuru.

The Minyipuru travelled close to Parnngurr where an important event took place in women’s law. From Parnngurr they flew to Kalypa, which is now Well 23. At Kalypa they met up with a large group of Jukurrpa men, the first time that men had ever seen women and women had seen men. The men tried to grab the ladies and the ladies chased them and hit them with their wana [hitting sticks]. Then they left, leaving the men lying there. There is a song and dance for this place called Marrkupayi and both men and women perform parts of the dance.

They continued dancing as they travelled to Katarru, now Well 24. And then they flew to Yurungu [on the eastern side of the CSR]. They flew from Yurungu and they turned and looked behind them and there was a group of other people, Niminjarra, who were travelling west. The Niminjarra were looking for Nganyangu’s wives, in a place called Pirrkanjil. Nganyangu became the bodyguard for Kumpupirntily, protecting people from Ngayurnangalku, the Jukurrpa cannibal people.

The ladies walked to Yurrunguny and Mungurlyi and then they flew to Nyipil, now Well 34, where they heard the sound of Kinyu howling. They heard Wulkartungara [a ladies’ song] and another song called Yaruparrupa. From Nyipil the Minyipuru flew to Yanjiwarra jurnu where they danced and near the desert oaks they left the mark of their dancing. The Minyipuru can be seen today as a group of trees between Nyipil and Kunawarritji.

The Minyipuru then flew to Pangkapirni between Wells 35 & 36, where the man Yurla who had been following them from Roebourne, finally caught up with them. The ladies watched him sleep and when he woke up he tried to grab one of them. The other ladies tried to help their sister escape, but they couldn’t free her. The ladies made Yurla collect wood for them and promised that they would stay with him. They teased him saying, ‘Come and get us!’ and he began to sing a man’s song and ran away happy, his heart was beating fast. But the ladies were tricking him and hid from him. They were floating in a long line in mid-air and he ran around trying to find their tracks. Finally they made a kumpu on his face, until he couldn’t see anything at all and then they were able to free their sister. Yurla couldn’t see anything, but he could hear the Seven Sisters giggling and laughing from somewhere above him. He got a janga, a ladder of wood, and tried to reach them but they just floated higher and then pushed the ladder over when he got too close. He became tired finally and fell down, crawling on his stomach. He crawled a long way and then slept, and while he was asleep, the Seven Sisters all flew away.

They took off flying to a place next to Lipuru, now Well 37, called Lurrungpungu where eventually Yurla caught up to them again. It was here that he tried to grab five of the ladies. From here the Seven Sisters took off again flying to Lunpu and then Majarral and then on to Marapinti near Kiwirrkurra where there are rocks sitting up like ladies. The ladies had a feed at Marapinti and then pierced their noses; this is what the word marapinti means.

Some of the other places where the Minyipuru stopped on their journey to Marapinti include Wantili claypan (near Well 25) and Tiwa, (Well 26). From there the ladies flew on to Jurntujurntu, (Well 30). Kukulyurr is a permanent water where the Minyipuru sat down to rest before travelling onwards. They also rested at Juntiwa [going west, towards Telfer] and at Pangkaringka and Karlajaru. They landed at Juntiwa when they were coming from Pangkaringka and they also stopped at Natawalu before continuing on their journey. They also stopped to rest at Kukulurrpa and Jarnu warla [a lake]. At Pankarlpa the man who was chasing the Seven Sisters caught one of the ladies.

END
Source: CSROH_287_Minyipuru
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Mantararr Rosie Williams, Mulyatingki Marney, Jakayu Biljabu, Ngalangka Nola Taylor, Morika Biljabu; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Morika Biljabu, KJ Kenneth Martin, Clint Dixon

Clint Dixon, KJ Kenneth Martin - favourite paintings and CSR Project [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Clint Dixon and KJ Kenneth Martin talk about their favourtie paintings and the way the Canning Stock Route Project is important in telling blackfella stories and history. Clint hopes that kids will learn about it in schools.

Date: 2008-10-30
Art centre(s): Martumili Artists
Language spoken: English
Catalogue number: CSROH_192_Morika_Biljabu_KJ_Kenneth_Martin_Clint_Dixon
Date: 2008-10-30
Location Recorded: National Museum of Australia, Canberra
Latitude/Longitude: -35.291492/149.117931

Cultural Protocols: Public Access
Access: Public
Notes: Morika Biljabu doesn't speak in this interview.
Full transcript: [Multimedia team talk about how they're feeling]

KJ Kenneth Martin: I don’t know. What I seen is not much talking, you know what I mean. I’m going to get back at these guys, because we’re here to record them and they’re not really doing much talking about these paintings or anything like that. Only when the camera off they start, that’s what she thinks, she said real quietly.

Clint Dixon: Yeah, I reckon this things getting stronger. At least they’ve got some sort of structure now, at least they know where they’re going, at this point.

KM: What else?

[KJ's favourite painting - Richard Yukenbarri]

KM: I don’t know why I picked this photo. Can you see that, camera … shot … painting? By Richard … Richard what? Yukenbarri? Yeah. I don’t know, I’ve been on the Canning Stock Route and that just reminds me of being back there, you know? Even if it’s not about the Canning Stock Route, is it? Yeah, it is too. Between [Well] 33 and … and all these white dots that are like a wave, to me anyway, is all them sand dunes.

[Clint's favourite painting - Jan Billycan]

CD: It’s like Patrick’s one, but after you keep coming back too much to choose from and more keep catching your eye. You know, like this one, this trip now, this one here keeps catching my eye. Is that the right way? Yeah from Jan Billycan. Yeah, I don’t know it just keeps catching my eye on this trip. But I can’t explain why I like this painting. Yeah, I suppose it’s to do with the colours, pattern, just how she does it. It looks like hills and mountains and rocks and things. But I just like … I don’t know, just the colour and pattern catches my eye. Also, like I said the Patrick Olodoodi one and also the one KJ had up earlier on. Same … it reminds me of sand dunes, like when the wind blows, leaves sort of like a lining pattern. So, yeah. Like I said, with every trip you keep coming back there’s always one that keep pulling you and so much to choose from … and they’re all good.

Nicole Ma: Do you want to be curators?

KM: No! Too much hard work, can’t do it. I feel sorry for you guys when this thing gets a bit tighter than this.

CD: I reckon I’ll probably end up colour blind, all these different colours. Yeah, I reckon too much to choose from.

KM: Yeah, it’ll get really hard right at the end. When you’re selecting the last main ones, all the things you have to think about when you’re selecting them, like what they were talking about today, like is it relevant to the Canning Stock Route? Does it tie in with another one that … say Well 37 does it … is there a story for that back here, you know, and it’s in that language group, sort of thing. Like they all got that one big Dreamtime story and that one there joins up with this one here and then this one here joins up with that one there as well. Which one out of those three do you choose, you know? Like, this one got its story which is same as this one which is same as that one. And they all good paintings and then you have to choose only one, which is going to get really, really hard, that’s why I can’t see myself being a curator. All this would be in the exhibit.

CD: It’s probably the same as what we do. Cataloguing, choosing what material to use that’s good.

NM: What's important to you? (In terms of the Canning Stock Route Project)

KM: The blackfella story is I suppose, of what the Canning Stock Route really is all about, you know. Like, it’s not what it’s made out to be in the Western world, you know, they get educated that it’s this great big breakthrough getting all this cattle and stuff down there, but I suppose they don’t know all the killing and stuff like that, you know. And the ties to the land, you know, Aboriginal people they belong to the land, you know, they belong to the land and they look after the land and then this happened and … I suppose that’s something. Oh, this thing here is something good that the world can see, the Aboriginal Indigenous story, you know, what happened to them to have this stock route.

CD: I reckon it’s good, about time something like this … especially for the Kimberley mob, don’t know, I didn’t know anything about the Canning Stock Route, you know. This … like good learning, people need to know this history as well, you know, instead of just … like mainly when you’re going to school you don’t learn nothing about this sort of stuff, you hear about the Canning Stock Route but you don’t hear the behind stories, like how it ended up being the Canning Stock Route. This is … I reckon this is going to be good, people are going to listen, you know, understand. Especially most of the white Australians need to know where we are, where we from, you know, really. They’ve gotta stop living that denial, that Aboriginal people was here, instead of we come across from Asia or wherever, you know. You’ve still got most of the people who are still living that denial that we’re not from here, but we are. And we also tell our stories through our paintings and that’s the only way we can express our feelings, what happened, our story, our families and things like that. I reckon this is a good learning point for everybody once it gets out. Like, I learnt a lot, just being here with all the crew and stuff like that. But, yeah, we gotta be recognised as well, where we come from.

NM: What kind of audience do you hope it will attract?

CD: I hope it will attract a lot of them. Hopefully this will go down into schools as well for learning purposes, history. Not only … ah … I’m getting lost now, nervous. Yeah, hope this also goes into schools and people can also learn as well, the white side and the black side of the history. ‘Cause there’s a lot of things that needs to be opened, you know, and once this gets out hopefully everyone will be able to learn to get along more better together, instead of showing so much hate and stuff like that. So as long as you get two stories, you’re right.

END
Video format: DVD/MiniDV/Quicktime movie
Video recording: Tape 46
Source: CSROH_192_Morika_Biljabu_KJ_Kenneth_Martin_Clint_Dixon
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Morika Biljabu, KJ Kenneth Martin, Clint Dixon; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Kunkun


Traditional knowledge: Long time ago old people used to have [family] in their heart and now they start painting about the family. Must be how strong [Kumpaya] is to tell stories her own way so the grandchildren and young ones who don’t know can learn. And not only kids but young men too so they can know their Country and pass the story to their young children. Kumpaya was telling stories not just for her own family but for everybody, so they could learn. (Joshua Booth, 2009)

Related art centre(s): Other

Media title: Kunkun
Media creator: Morika Biljabu
Date: 2008

Media description: Kunawarritji kids at Kunkun windmill
Media Copyright: Morika Biljabu
Format: Image
Accession ID: FORM_MIRA_B0088_0041

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Pangkapini


Place description: Pangkapini lies between Wells 35 (Jarntu) and 36 (Kilykily).

Traditional knowledge: In the Jukurrpa the old man Yurla had been chasing the Seven Sisters or Minyipuru from the coast near Roebourne. At Pangkapini, which lies between Wells 35 and 36, he caught one of the sisters:

[At Pangkapini] the man was sleeping flat out, with his belly on the ground. The ladies watched him sleep and when he woke up he grabbed one of them and slept with her. The other ladies tried to help her escape but they couldn’t free her. The ladies made Yurla collect wood for them and promised to stay with him. They teased him saying, ‘Come and get us!’ and he began to sing a man’s song and ran away happy, his heart was beating fast. But the ladies were tricking him. They were floating in a long line in mid-air and he ran around trying to find their tracks. They made a kumpu [urinated] on his face, until he couldn’t see anything at all but he could hear the Seven Sisters giggling and laughing from somewhere above him. He got a janga, a ladder of wood, and tried to reach them but they just floated higher and then kept pushing the ladder over when he got too close. He got tired and fell down, crawling on his stomach. He crawled a long way and then slept, and while he was asleep the Seven Sisters all flew away. They flew from here to Lurunpunkunja, but the man didn’t know that. He looked around but couldn’t see them anywhere. Then he got up and walked towards the east. He was trying and trying and trying … (Jugarda Dulcie Gibbs, Mantarrar Rosie Williams, Nora Wompi, Nora Nangapa, Ngalangka Nola Taylor, 2007 and 2009)

-22.15588/125.19628
Related art centre(s): Martumili Artists

Media title: Artists at Pangkapini
Media creator: Morika Biljabu
Date: 2007

Media description: Artists at Pangkapini
Media Copyright: Morika Biljabu
Format: Image
Accession ID: FORM_MIRA_B0088_0025

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Kunawarritji

Non-Indigenous name: Well 33
Historical name: Gunowaggi

Traditional knowledge: My mother used to leave us alone, my brother and I [when she went hunting]. I used to cry for my mother to carry me around, but my brother would help look after me. My brother used to carry me, leave me in the shade and wet my hair, and I would wait for my parents to come home with meat. We would wait and see my mother coming with food, and my brother would run to our parents to get the meat while I was sitting in the shade waiting.

We used to share food together as a family… My brother got sick and died and my other brother went north and passed away. I was alone. I stayed with my family and got bigger, and then I went north [to Balgo] when I was old enough to hunt for my own meat. (Nora Wompi, 2008)

This is my mother’s homeland, my grandfather’s, my uncle’s. I move back here in 1983. Kunawarritji. We just talking about homeland movement then we move up here. No houses, just a windmill. That’s how the thing started now. Later on now, stay here. And I was thinking about to start this business. It was my idea and now it’s a service station for tourist to come through. They all interested in this Country. Our Country is beautiful, magnificent, that why the tourist like it. People like it. Better place. I was living in better life in my days, just walking and walking for days, months. I know where to go. I know where the waters are. I can travel in night. Which way is the south, which way the kayili [north], which way the kakarra [east]. In the middle people’s homelands. We got a family any way where I wanna go. (Jeffrey James, 2007)

Native title area: Martu determination
Well data: 1906 quality: First class

1906 total depth (m): 9

Current total depth (m): 5

Current quality of well: Derelict, caved in

Current quality of water: Brackish, no smell

Current depth to water: 1.5

Current depth of water: 3

Total dissolved salts (ppm): 165

PH level: 7.8

PH level date: 2007
-22.34188/124.77525
Related art centre(s): Martumili Artists

Media title: Martunmili artists at Kunawarritji
Media creator: Morika Biljabu
Date: 2008

Media description: Nora Wompi, Bugai Whylouter, Kumpaya Girgaba, and Nora Nangapa at Kunawarritji, Well 33
Media Copyright: Morika Biljabu
Format: Image
Accession ID: FORM_MIRA_B0088_0022

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Video Title: Living in the desert

Video Description: This film by Morika Biljabu tracks the Kunawarritji community. Elders and children are shown weaving baskets, painting, and dancing. Artists Nyangapa Nora Nangapa, Kumpaya Girgaba and Ngarnjapayi Nancy Chapman talk about their family's Country, their travels through Country, and their first experiences with kartiya.

Date created: 2009
People: Nyangapa Nora Nangapa, Kumpaya Girgaba, Ngarnjapayi Nancy Chapman, Hayley Atkins
Art Centre(s): Martumili Artists, CSR Project

Director: Morika Biljabu
Editor: Chris Mylrea
Camera: Morika Biljabu
Sound: Music by Punmu Lakeside Band
Translator: Morika Biljabu, Nola Taylor
Executive Producer: FORM

Rights: © Morika Biljabu
Clip length:0:06:34
Protocols:PUBLIC ACCESS
Format: Video
Category: Video
Accession ID: 20131017_FORM_MIRA_B0056_0001

Provenance:This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Video Title: Nana

Video Description: Filmed at Kilykily (Well 36) on the 2007 Canning Stock Route return to Country trip, Nana follows the story of Martumili artist Jakayu Biljabu, who grew up in the Country around Well 25. Morika Biljabu is the granddaughter of Jakayu, thus the title Nana.

Date created: 2007
People: Jakayu Biljabu, Morika Biljabu
Art Centre(s): Martumili Artists, CSR Project
Place of creation: Well 36, Kilykily, singing, travelling, Jigalong, Kartarru, Nyilangkurr, Well 25, Wantili
Latitude/Longitude: -22.13954/125.28315
Language: Manyjilyjarra

Director: Morika Biljabu
Editor: Paul Elliott
Camera: Morika Biljabu
Translator: Desmond Taylor, Bobby Roberts, Monique La Fontaine
Executive Producer: FORM

Rights: © Morika Biljau and FORM Canning Stock Route Project, 2007
Clip length: 0:03:58
Protocols: PUBLIC ACCESS
Format: Video
Source: Screen 4 Video
Category: Video
Accession ID: 20130920_FORM_MIRA_B0023_0003

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

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