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Nicole Ma

Kiki and the pearl shell

Story:From the Dreamtime, [the ancestral hero] Kiki was coming from the sky, looking for a place to live. He came down near Paruku and went down in the water. 'Kiki felt hungry after travelling a long way and made plants and put them round everywhere. He made the plants grow. Plants you can grind to make flour, seeds, little grapes, some healing stuff too. He put all them frogs that people eat, bandicoots, blue tongue lizards, animals that used to live out there. What we still eat today is from that old fella. 'Kiki had a white stone in the Dreamtime and he tried to hide it in that big lake. But it kept on floating up. Bandicoot man came along and found that thing floating in the water. He stole it and threw it in the ocean near Broome. From there it turned into a pearl shell. That’s why Broome is rich with pearl shells. It [the pearl shell] started from Paruku. It didn’t want to hide.' (Yanpiyarti Ned Cox and Putuparri Tom Lawford, Ngumpan, 2008)

Media Creator:Nicole Ma

Media date: 2010
Story Location: Paruku (Lake Gregory)

Media Description:Men, women and children from Billiluna and Mulan communities perform dances for the ancestral creation being Kiki, who created the food and animals in the Country surrounding Paruku (Lake Gregory).

Story contributor(s):Yanpiyarti Ned Cox, Putuparri Tom Lawford

Art Centre(s): Paruku Indigenous Protected Area
Publisher: FORM
Media copyright: FORM
Accession ID:20131024_FORM_MIRA_B0046_0005

This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Natawalu: the Helicopter Story

Story:Many of the people from the Western Desert followed the stock route out of the desert once the drovers began moving through the Country. Following the stock route to find things beyond the desert, many people settled in cattle stations or missions.

However, in 1957 'Helicopter' Tjungurrayi left the desert in a very different way. As a child he was seriously ill when a mining survey party landed their helicopter near his community near Natawalu. His mother’s sister Kupunyina (Kumpaya Girgaba’s mother) was also suffering from an ulcerated spear wound. Knowing about the mission at Balgo their relatives encouraged the survey crew to take them for medical attention.The kartiya [white people] flew him Balgo to get medical attention. When he failed to return his family travelled north in groups to find him.
 
First Walapayi then Brandy walked north to Balgo. Both eventually returned south, following the stock route wells, to bring their relatives back with them to the mission. Helicopter Tjungurrayi has been known by this name for so long, he can no longer remember what he was called before.

'My young brother [Helicopter] was so sick; he had sores everywhere and he was helpless, a little boy. I grabbed my little brother and showed them. So kartiya [white people] looked at his sores and said, "OK, we’ll take him", because he was so sick. So I asked the kartiya, "Are you going to bring him back?" He was speaking his language and I was speaking my language. I kept on saying, "Are you going to bring him back?" I waited, waited, waited for long and I wondered, "They’re not bringing him back!" Nothing. It was getting a bit longer, and I said to myself, I think I’ll go after him north. From there I kept walking right, long way, all the way to Balgo.' (Charlie Wallabi (Walapayi) Tjungurrayi, 2007)

Media Creator:Nicole Ma

Media date: 2010
Story Location: Natawalu (Well 40)
-21.66779/125.78843

Media Description:Josephine Nangala recounts the first time she saw a helicopter, and the story of Helicopter Joey Tjungarrayi being taken by helicopter to Balgo for medicine.

Story contributor(s): John Carty, Helicopter Joey Tjungurrayi, Charlie Wallabi (Walapayi) Tjungurrayi, Josephine Nangala

Art Centre(s): Warlayirti Artists
Publisher: FORM
Media copyright: FORM
Accession ID:20131024_FORM_MIRA_B0046_0004

This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Rover Thomas and his Brother

Story:Rover Thomas is one of Australia's most important artists - his paintings sparked a greater appreciation of Aboriginal art, both nationally and internationally.

Although he found fame as an East Kimberley artist Rover was a desert man, and the story of his life is interwoven with that of the Canning Stock Route. Rover was born in the 1920s in the Country near the middle stretch of the stock route. After his parents passed away he was picked up by a drover, Wally Dowling, who took him north to Billiluna and the Kimberley. Rover became a stockman himself. He was married and settled in Turkey Creek.

When Rover was taken by drovers his brother, Charlie Brooks (Clifford Brooks' father) was away travelling. When he returned Rover was gone. Charlie set off in search of his brother from Martilirri (Well 22). On his journey he encountered a horrible scene somewhere near Well 41:

'[My father] went looking for his young brother Rover back in his home Country, but nothing, empty. No track. Only track was a wagon wheel and yawarta (horse) and bullock, that's all... He been get up on a sandhill and he been look down... whitefella, massacre. They been got shot: [Aboriginal] men, women and children.' (Clifford Brooks)

'That old fella [Clifford’s father, Charlie], he knew in his heart that his young brother was still alive. Every time in the camp fire he used to tell me … 'My young brother is still alive somewhere up north.'' (Clifford Brooks)

Charlie Brooks and Rover Thomas were finally reunited in the 1980s, a lifetime later, after family recognised the Rover’s face in a newspaper. Charlie Brooks travelled to see his brother again for the first time, Clifford Brooks describes the intial encounter between the brothers:

'So when he arrived I got him off the bus at night, took him across to the car park. My old man was standing up and I took Rover across, and they didn’t know whether to yampulkaku [hug] or shake hand, they been cry. But I stood in the back there, I had tears coming out my eyes. I cried for them.' (Clifford Brooks)

'You have got to come back to your Country. You should have come through the Canning Stock Route. You went away from here through the stock route and you should have come back here, through the stock route. I’ve been waiting for you.' (Charlie Brooks to Rover Thomas, 1986)

Media Creator:Nicole Ma

Media date: 2010
Story Location: Wiluna
-26.59/120.22

Media Description:Clifford Brooks tells story his father's reunion with his younger brother Rover Thomas after 40 years apart.

Story contributor(s):Clifford Brooks, John Carty, Jarntu Rover Thomas, Charlie Brooks

Art Centre(s): Birriliburu Artists
Publisher: FORM
Media copyright: FORM
Source: CSROH_140_Clifford Brooks
Accession ID:20131024_FORM_MIRA_B0046_0007

This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Name: Nicole Ma

Nicole Ma - Mentoring and filming for the project [ORAL HISTORY]


Synopsis: Nicole talks about becoming involved in the Canning Stock Route Project, the challenges of the six week Canning Stock Route trip, and finding a film crew who could handle the work and film in a fresh way. Nicole also talks about working with emerging filmmakers and the way young people act as role models. She also discusses her favourite painting.

Date: 2008-04-12
Art centre(s):
Language spoken: English
Catalogue number: CSROH_193_Nicole_Ma
Interviewed By: Clint Dixon
Location Recorded: Old Masonic Hall, Nedlands
Latitude/Longitude: -31.98/115.8

Cultural Protocols: Public Access - Verbal Consent
Access: Public
Full transcript: Clint Dixon: Can you introduce yourself?

Nicole Ma: OK, my name is Nicole Ma and I’m Chinese. I live in Melbourne. I’m a documentary filmmaker. And … I’ve been working in film for over twenty years

CD: How did you get involved with the CSR project?

NM: Um … the Canning Stock Route … originally I was asked to film the trip, the six-week trip from Wiluna to Halls Creek, and at the time they were talking about an exhibition and they wanted media for the exhibition, so they said could you come along and bring a crew and film sort of a … whatever happened on the stock route. And when we started we didn’t really have much of an idea what it was all going to be about so I had to just think through, well, what would we need on the trip and how can I film … I knew there would be painting camps along the trip, so I was thinking to myself how … what can I bring, because it’s a six week journey in a very remote area, I had to bring all the equipment and think through how to film paintings in particular in a way so that could have different looks, you know, so that it wasn’t all the same way of recording a painting – because it was a long trip. So it was quite an exercise in thinking through what equipment to bring and also crew-wise, who to bring, because they needed to be people who could have the stamina to do a six-week trip up the stock route.

CD: How many were in the film crew?

NM: In the crew there were three of us. I was the producer/director, we had a director of photography and a sound man who was also … he was also the grip as well which meant that he could rig … we brought a little mini crane as well so that we could do moves along the canvases and we also brought a steady cam, so that we could do, sort of, flowing walks along the sand and film tracks and film the paintings, you know, as they’re lying on the ground.

CD: Do you know much about the CSR?

NM: Not when I started, I knew nothing about the Canning Stock Route. Prior to going I read a book about it, but … the Canning Stock Route is … and when I said to people in Melbourne I’m going on the Canning Stock Route, we’re going on a trip and we’re filming it, most people had no idea where the Canning Stock Route was, so they were like me, we had no idea what the Canning Stock Route was, had no idea that it had a history. I didn’t really, in particular, know that there was any Aboriginal history associated with it.

CD: What has it been like working with the emerging filmmakers?

NM: It’s been fantastic for me to work with the three emerging filmmakers. Originally it was not something that was planned. When we … when the Canning Stock Route Project was initiated they said we’re going to have some emerging filmmakers come along, but they didn’t have one filmmaker come – I think Morika came for her Country with her art centre and you yourself came at the end, so you were at the Late Stretch section and KJ came for about three quarters of the way, he was probably there the most. Initially it wasn’t an emerging filmmakers program, initially it was just having interns come along and watch us as the crew, as a professional crew work and have them help us and then maybe, you know, do some work with the professional crew. But then as we were going along the stock route we also brought with us a little computer so that we could edit stuff as we went along and I thought it might be a good idea to have the curators … the young filmmakers make their own film about the stock route, because we had the cameras and we had the editing and we could, you know, do it pretty quickly. So everyone made their own film on the route and I think that’s what started the thought process about including an emerging filmmakers program within the whole scope of the project. And as the project has gone along it’s just gotten bigger and bigger, you know, more programs have been added in and the importance of having, of … allowing young people the experience to head this project has emerged as being one of the most important components of the whole thing.

CD: Have you worked with young filmmakers before?

NM: I have gone to remote communities to do filmmaking workshops, so it’s very different. So they were people who might have an interest in it but have never done it before, so I would have to teach them, you know, filmmaking from the very beginning - they didn’t know how to use the camera, they didn’t know how to use a computer. But the people who came on the Canning Stock Route were on a level above that, they had some experience, in your case quite a bit of experience, in the field so they knew how to operate a camera and they knew about editing and understood the process of filmmaking. And so as professionals we could take them and we could mentor them on a much more sophisticated level. So that, by making it … I think, personally, the only real way you learn anything in film is to make them yourself. So by them watching what we were doing and then having a chance to make their own film, they could … we could guide them in the process and supervise their needs. So if they needed … if they wanted to know something they had the opportunity to have someone support them in the project, but in fact do the films themselves – and I think that was the best way to learn for most people.

CD: Can you tell me about the movie nights?

NM: Yeah, we had … not every night, but when we stopped at a camp for a few days we’d set up this bush edit suite under the trees and we’d have two computers going and at night after we’d had dinner we’d sit down and start editing the footage of the emerging filmmakers. And we cut two films, which once they were finished we hung up a painting, back to front, on a car, and screen the films. So we’d have film nights along the stock route as well. Not only footage that Morika and KJ had made, the films they’d made, but we’d also show people the footage that we were taking – you know of Country, and of the people painting and whatever else was happening because we not only filmed the landscape, the paintings, we were also filming the reality of the journey and what was happening along the way. So we’d screen those as well, in the evening.

CD: How are you feeling about the project as it progresses?

NM: Well, as it’s going along … as the project has progressed I have gradually started to feel more and more excited about it, because I feel that it’s not just the project anymore, it’s more … it’s the ramifications of what we’re doing is much broader. It’s moving into the whole of the Kimberly, into the Northern Territory, it feels like the waves of what we’re doing because of the emerging curator’s program and because of the emerging filmmaker’s program is going to reverberate through the whole of the North of Australia because it means that these young people are going to become known for what they do, they’re going to act as role models for young people in remote communities who can say well, if they can do it I can do it too. So we need to … the opportunity for the emerging … these emerging young people to actually be a voice for the project, which I think is what’s happening - they’ve become the voice of the project, it’s going to encourage a lot of other young people in remote communities to want to do something too and … and that it’s not that difficult, as difficult as they imagine, to do something that they really love. And if we can find a way to get that across to the young people, that these young people, this is what they’ve done you can do it to, I think would be the greatest achievement of the Canning Stock Route Project.

CD: Do you have a favourite painting or artist?

NM: My favourite artist comes from, and I’m probably saying this really badly, the Ngurra claim because since I’ve been working in the Kimberly, you know it’s been seven years now that I’ve been actually going up there and filming a lot, I have started to learn more and more about what the old people’s stories are and what the stories are for the canvas and I like … because I feel close to them, I feel like they’re my friends and because I feel like they’re my friends I feel like their paintings are my friends and their paintings … I just love them all because I actually like them all very much and that’s why I like … well, any painting from that area I feel close to, I feel a relationship to and I feel that it speaks to me, the stories, because of what they’ve been teaching me, the old people from there.

CD: Anything else to add?

NM: Lets stop it, I’ll think about that.

END


Video recording: Tape 13
Source: CSROH_193_Nicole_Ma
Rights: © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Bill Snell - The Reconditioning

Story:After three drovers were killed at Lipuru (Well 37) in 1911, the stock route was barely used again for 20 years. Left to the elements, the wells fell into disrepair. By 1917 more than half had been vandalised or destroyed by Aboriginal people, making it nearly impossible for the stock route to be used by drovers until 1930 when repairs were completed. In 1926 another Royal Commission into beef prices recommended that the stock route be reopened. And so, three years later, William Snell was employed to recondition the wells. He was extremely critical of Canning’s wells. Snell saw few people south of Well 17, but from Wells 17 to 51 he reported large groups of up to 300 Aboriginal people, who depended on the stock route waters. The wells leached water out of important native soaks, and Aboriginal people had often been injured, or even killed, trying to obtain water from them.  Snell felt that Canning’s failure to ensure Aboriginal people had access to these waters had seriously injured relations between them and the white men, resulting in the killing of the first drovers and the deliberate destruction of wells. Snell began to fit ladders to the wells in the populated areas, but he ran out of materials at Well 35. In 1930 Alfred Canning, by then nearly 70, was called on to complete the job. Interestingly, Canning reported a number of hostilities on this trip, where Snell had experienced none. William Snell reconditioned the stock route wells in 1929 and was highly critical of their impact on traditional waters and on the Aboriginal people who relied on them. But he paid a heavy price for criticising Canning: publicly ridiculed and accused of incompetence, he eventually went into self-imposed exile on his pastoral station near Weld Springs (Well 9) and became an eccentric recluse. Snell had been a remarkable character in his own right. He once rode a bicycle about 2000 kilometres from Adelaide to Menzies in the Western Australian goldfields, before there was any road to use. He later moved to Leonora with an Afghan hawker’s van and set up a shop; within six months he had become mayor of the town. Before Snell arrived water had been sold from a cart, so he established a permanent town water supply. In 1908 the Bulletin described Leonora as ‘the most precocious small town in Australia’: it had electric lights, electric trams, a fire brigade and a steam tram that ran to the mine. But Snell was dissatisfied with his life there, and left to establish a property south of Lake Nabberu. He later ran a butcher shop in Wiluna before setting up his own station near Weld Springs. Snell was also a good friend of drover Wally Dowling, who called in to see him in 1942: ‘I saw him alright. I found his head about of a mile from his camp, and the rest of him at the camp.’ Snell had died of natural causes, but by the time Wally found him, Snell’s own dogs had begun to eat him. Wally, who was prone to exaggeration, claimed that he conveyed the news of Snell’s death to Wiluna by smoke signal.

Media Creator:Nicole Ma

Media date: 2010
Story Location: Lipuru (Well 37)
-22.15497/125.45911

Media Description:After three drovers were killed at Lipuru (Well 37) in 1911, the stock route was barely used for 20 years. Left to the elements, the wells fell into disrepair. By 1917 more than half had been vandalised or destroyed by Aboriginal people, making it nearly impossible for the stock route to be used by drovers until 1930 when repairs were completed.

Art Centre(s): Other
Publisher: FORM
Media copyright: FORM
Accession ID:DATE_FORM_MIRA_B0098_0004

This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

The Legend of John Forrest

Story:Sir John Forrest was Western Australia’s first premier. But he had first won fame as an explorer. In 1874 Forrest and his party stopped at a water source called Palarji, which he named Weld Springs. It would later become Well 9. They stayed there for two weeks. On the party’s 13th day at Weld Springs, violence broke out. According to Forrest, a group of 40–60 men, armed and painted, attacked his party. Forrest’s men fired on them, wounding some of the men. 'The natives seem determined to take our lives, and therefore I shall not hesitate to fire on them should they attack us again.' (John Forrest, 1874) At Palarji, Forrest built a fort to protect himself. It can still be seen today. He later claimed that the attackers were trying to drive his party away because it had occupied the spring for too long. But Aboriginal people tell a very different story about what happened at Palarji. 'John Forrester – this is where he used to hide himself or something like that, sit down here and people used to come in for water here in this spring and I think he rode with a camel, came to Number … 9 Well I think. And people used to live in this place and he sort of come in with a camel and … I don’t know what he was doing but he got funny with the people or might be Martu got funny with them whitefella and ah, he start, he start using a gun shootin’ em. Shooting all the Martu round here.' (Anga Friday Jones, 2007) Whatever happened at Palarji, this first conflict had a profound impact on Martu people. John Forrest has come to symbolise white cruelty, being attributed to acts of cruelty, and later killings, which he could not possibly have committed.

Media Creator:Nicole Ma

Media date: 2010
Story Location: Palarji [Well 9]

Media Description:Martu elders Anga Friday Jones at Forrest’s fort and Billy Patch (Mr P) in Wiluna describe the attack at Palarji (Well 9).

Story contributor(s):Billy Patch (Mr. P), Anga Friday Jones

Art Centre(s): Other
Publisher: FORM
Media copyright: FORM
Source: CSROH_02_Anga_Friday_Jones
Accession ID:DATE_FORM_MIRA_B0098_0005

This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Jila Men

Story:The nothern end of the Canning Stock Route crosses the Great Sandy Desert. Here springs are considered 'living waters' and are known as jila. Some are inhabited by ancestral beings and many of these jila are linked by Dreaming tracks that connect Countries and people. The ancestral stories of these sites are recorded in the songs and dances that cross the desert, uniting peoples through shared ceremonies and law. A number of these jila became wells on the Canning Stock Route. Of around 200 permanent springs or jila in this country, only about 30 are inhabited by powerful ancestral beings: snakes, which are also known as jila, or kalpurtu. Two of these jila, Kulyayi (Well 42) and Kaningarra (Well 48), became stock route wells. Before they became snakes, these jila were men who made rain, shaped the features of the land and introduced practices of law to the jila country. Many of the jila men were also companions who travelled the desert visiting one another, creating the ceremonies and singing the songs that the people of the jila country still perform today. One by one, the jila men ended their journeys at the waters that bear their names, and as they entered their jila, they transformed into the rainbow serpents, kalpurtu. These sites are of great importance to Aboriginal people and they can be as dangerous as they are vital. As places where rain is made, jila must first be ceremonially cleaned out by men. Crescent shaped banks are fashioned around the edge of the jila to signify kutukutu [rain-bearing clouds] before women are invited to approach. The dreaming stories of the jila men Kulyayi and Kaningarra are also connected to those of Kurtal and Wirnpa, two other important jila in this Country.

Media Creator:Nicole Ma

Media date: 2010

Media Description:Four dances are performed at the Ngumpan workshop, which took place at Ngumpan Community east of Fitzroy Crossing in late 2008.

Story contributor(s):Monique La Fontaine, Ngilpirr Spider Snell

Art Centre(s): Other
Publisher: FORM
Media copyright: FORM
Accession ID:DATE_FORM_MIRA_B0098_0001

This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Video Title: Damper

Video Description: Birriliburu artists Kaye Bingham and Annette Williams make damper at Jilakurru (Well 17).

Date created: 2010
People: Kaye Bingham, Annette Williams
Art Centre(s): Birriliburu Artists, Tjukurba Gallery, CSR Project
Place of creation: Well 17, Jilakurru
Latitude/Longitude: -23.73051/122.48453

Director: Nicole Ma
Editor: Brandt Lee
Camera: Paul Elliot
Sound: Cam McGrath
Executive Producer: FORM

Rights: © FORM
Clip length: 0:01:04
Protocols: PUBLIC ACCESS
Format: Video
Source: Screen 9 Video
Category: Video
Accession ID: DATE_FORM_MIRA_B0067_0001

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Video Title: Jilakurru: Disco Rock

Video Description: Watery reflections play on the surface of a rock at Jilakurru.

Date created: 2010
Art Centre(s): CSR Project
Place of creation: Durba Springs, Jilakurru
Latitude/Longitude: -23.75397/122.51669

Director: Nicole Ma
Editor: Chris Mylrea
Camera: Paul Elliot
Sound: Cam McGrath
Executive Producer: FORM

Rights: © FORM
Clip length: 0:01:12
Protocols: PUBLIC ACCESS
Format: Video
Category: Video
Accession ID: 20131021_FORM_MIRA_B0061_0005

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Video Title: Lake Aerodrome

Video Description: In 1929, William Snell was commissioned to recondition the stock route wells, which had fallen into disrepair. He was also asked to look out for potential aircraft landing sites. Thinking that the dry, flat, salty terrain of this lakebed would make a perfect landing surface, he named it Lake Aerodrome.

Date created: 2010
People: William Snell
Art Centre(s): CSR Project
Place of creation: Lake Aerodrome
Latitude/Longitude: -24.637968/121.828251

Director: Nicole Ma
Editor: Chris Mylrea
Camera: Paul Elliot
Sound: Cam McGrath
Executive Producer: FORM

Rights: © FORM
Clip length: 0:00:27
Protocols: PUBLIC ACCESS
Format: Video
Category: Video
Accession ID: 20131021_FORM_MIRA_B0061_0006

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

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