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Yurnangurnu Nola Campbell

Tika Tika

Artist(s): Yurnangurnu Nola Campbell

Date created: 2008
Art Centre(s): Kayili Artists
Size: 151.8x101.2
Medium: acrylic on linen

Artwork Story: My family and I were walking around in that [central stock route] Country. As a little girl I carried the water. I was following my uncles and my father, Walapayi [Charlie Wallabi Tjungurrayi], who raised me. I used to chase him around when I was little, to get meat. He’s my young father. My mother is Josephine [Nangala], my own mother’s younger sister. The Tika Tika rock holes were made by Ngirntaka, the perentie goanna. Ngirntaka stopped here for one night during the Jukurrpa before continuing west on his journey towards Warburton. Many people lived at Tika Tika before Patjarr community was established, including Nola, who camped here as a young girl with her father, and her uncles and aunties.

Artwork copyright: ©2013 Yurnangurnu Nola Campbell
Catalogue ID: NC/188/KA
Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on use

Photographer: Jason McCarthy
Photograph date: 2009-05-25
Photography copyright: National Museum of Australia
Format: Image
Category: Artwork

Artist(s) biography: born 1948 Manyjilyjarra language group Napaljarri skin group Patjarr community and Wiluna Kayili Artists Nola Campbell grew up travelling in the Country between Kiwirrkurra and Kunawarritji. She is related to Charlie Wallabi (Walapayi) Tjungurrayi and Nangkatji Josephine Nangala, whom she called father and mother, and Kumpaya Girgaba, her aunt. Nola was taken to Warburton as a young woman and there she married her first husband. She moved to Wiluna and later Patjarr, where she later married artist Coiley Campbell.

Accession ID: 20131014_FORM_MIRA_B0045_0058

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Yurnangurnu Nola Campbell

Yurnangurnu Nola Campbell - family, and learning to paint [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Nola Campbell talks about her family and learning to paint. She also talkjs about her uncle Nyarri-nyarri and her aunty Kumpaya Girgaba.

Date: 2008-04-21
Art centre(s): Kayili Artists
Language spoken: Nyaanyatjarra
Catalogue number: CSROH_60_Yurnangurnu_Nola_Campbell
Date: 2008-04-21
Translated By: Lizzie Ellis, Jan Mountney
Location Recorded: Patjarr
Latitude/Longitude: -24.61/126.31

Cultural Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on Use
Access: Public
Notes: When this was translated it was unclear who the interviewer asking the questions was, John Carty or Tim Acker, as such they are just listed as Interviewer in this transcript. Some corrections and additions were gathered when the permission was signed for this story on 29 May 2009, these changes have been included in this transcript. The transcript is incomplete.
Full transcript: Nola Campbell: My father is Walapayi and my mother is Josephine, my young mother, my own mother’s younger sister. My biological mother died a long time ago, when we were living in the bush.

Interviewer: Did you see Walapayi at that time when you were living in the bush?

NC: Yes, I saw him. I also saw the girls there. I was walking and living in the bush at that time. That’s when I got married to Mr. Campbell at that time too, in Warburton.

Before I began painting I wasn’t working. I looked for work but there was nothing available. Then Albi gave me some canvas to do a painting. That’s when I started to paint and to learn more about painting.

I helped the people at Kiwirrkurra to paint, with my second husband Mr Butler. I started painting here in Patjarr and used to send paintings to Albi and she would send money. I’m still painting for Michael and he pays me. But he owes me money now – he’s gone to Darwin. From the paintings I don’t get all the money. Some is put in a bank in Alice Springs and I get paid the rest. I give money to my four grandchildren living here. Most of my family still live in Wiluna.

Interviewer: Who’s you family in Wiluna?

NC: Bernard Campbell, Cyril Morgan and the rest of the Morgan family.

Interviewer: All the Morgans?

NC: Yes, all the Morgans. Junior Morgan has worked here in the past.

Interviewer: Can you tell us a bit about when you were a little girl?

NC: Yes. I used to live around the Country of Tjupi-tjupi.

Interviewer: Tell me about when you were living in Kiwirrkura. Were you born at Jupiter Well, Puntatjarrpa?

NC: I was born at Partarr.

Interviewer: Is Partarr between Kiwirrkurra and Kunawarratji?

NC: Yes, in the middle, south of Kiwirrkurra.

Interviewer: What language were you speaking when you were small?

NC: I was speaking my own Aboriginal language, Manyjilyjarra. I used to play at school in Warburton Ranges. I went to school there for a short time and then left. Then, as a young teenager I returned to Warburton and lived there until I became a young adult. I married my husband there, Mr Campbell and went with him and my father to Wiluna. My father passed away in Wiluna and my mother’s younger sister then married Navel Morgan. My grandmothers raised me here in Patjarr.

While we were living in Wiluna, I had my first baby in Meekatharra, and took the baby back to Wiluna. Later, I came back this way and that man Tjakamarra Butler arranged a marriage between me and another man. My second marriage.

Interviewer: Truly?

NC: Yes, I was married to two men.

Interviewer: When you were walking round, did you travel around the Stock Route Country?

NC: Yes.

Interviewer: Did you visit family there?

NC: Yes, I was walking round there with my uncle Nyarri-nyarri. Do you know Nyarri-nyarri, my uncle? The one who lives at Parnngurr? He’s my uncle.

Interviewer: Is he your uncle on your mother’s side?

NC: Yes.

Interviewer: Did you ever see the drovers bringing bullocks down the stock route?

NC: No, my family and I were walking around in that Country, south east side of stock route and as a little girl, I carried the water. I was following my uncles and my father, the old man Walapayi, who raised me. I used to chase him around when I was little, to get meat. He’s my young father and my other father, the tall one, lives at Parnngurr. And I have two uncles, Nyarri-nyarri and Manimpatjarra.

Interviewer: Which side of the family?

NC: He’s living at Parnngurr. My aunty Kumpaya [Girgaba] is also at Parnngurr. My biological mother has many brothers. She died here at Karilwara. I was only a baby when she passed away and my father raised me.

Interviewer: When you came from the bush, did you go to Warburton?

NC: Yes, Maramutu (Missionary) brought my family to Warburton when I was a little girl and Lynette was too. Maramutu has passed away now. He found us in the bush and took us to Warburton and we lived there until we grew up going to school there. My father was alive when we were living there. He lived in Warburton for a long time and later he went to Wiluna where he passed away. In Wiluna he married Gail Morgan and she gathered all us sons and daughters together and raised us all.

[The translation was ended here due to confusion and contradictions in the recording]

END
Video format: miniDV/DVD
Video recording: 150 NOLA CAMPBELL & PULPURRU DAVIES
Source: CSROH_60_Yurnangurnu_Nola_Campbell
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Yurnangurnu Nola Campbell; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Yurnangurnu Nola Campbell

Born: about 1948

Language Group(s): Manyjilyjarra
Community: Patjarr
Art Centre(s): Kayili Artists
CSR Project role: Aboriginal translator, artist, contributor
Skin Group: Napaljarri
Country: Tika Tika, Kurnangurra

Biography: Nola Campbell grew up travelling in the Country between Kiwirrkurra and Kunawarritji. She is related to Charlie Wallabi (Walapayi) Tjungurrayi and Nangkatji Josephine Nangala, whom she called father and mother, and Kumpaya Girgaba, her aunt. Nola was taken to Warburton as a young woman and there she married her first husband. She moved to Wiluna and later Patjarr, where she later married artist Coiley Campbell.

Photographer: Tim Acker
Photograph date: 2008
Photography copyright: © FORM
Format: Image
Source: Images - Catalogue
Category: People
Accession ID: 20131016_FORM_MIRA_B0090_0008

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

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