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Kiki

Kiki and the pearl shell

Story:From the Dreamtime, [the ancestral hero] Kiki was coming from the sky, looking for a place to live. He came down near Paruku and went down in the water. 'Kiki felt hungry after travelling a long way and made plants and put them round everywhere. He made the plants grow. Plants you can grind to make flour, seeds, little grapes, some healing stuff too. He put all them frogs that people eat, bandicoots, blue tongue lizards, animals that used to live out there. What we still eat today is from that old fella. 'Kiki had a white stone in the Dreamtime and he tried to hide it in that big lake. But it kept on floating up. Bandicoot man came along and found that thing floating in the water. He stole it and threw it in the ocean near Broome. From there it turned into a pearl shell. That’s why Broome is rich with pearl shells. It [the pearl shell] started from Paruku. It didn’t want to hide.' (Yanpiyarti Ned Cox and Putuparri Tom Lawford, Ngumpan, 2008)

Media Creator:Nicole Ma

Media date: 2010
Story Location: Paruku (Lake Gregory)

Media Description:Men, women and children from Billiluna and Mulan communities perform dances for the ancestral creation being Kiki, who created the food and animals in the Country surrounding Paruku (Lake Gregory).

Story contributor(s):Yanpiyarti Ned Cox, Putuparri Tom Lawford

Art Centre(s): Paruku Indigenous Protected Area
Publisher: FORM
Media copyright: FORM
Accession ID:20131024_FORM_MIRA_B0046_0005

This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Name: Yanpiyarti Ned Cox

Yanpiyarti Ned Cox and Tom Lawford - Kiki Jukurrpa story [ORAL HISTORY]

Other Speaker/s: Putuparri Tom Lawford

Synopsis: Ned Cox and Tom Lawford tell the story of the Jukurrpa ancestor Kiki.

Date: 2008-09-05
Art centre(s):
Language spoken: Walmajarri, English, Kriol
Catalogue number: CSROH_178_Yanpiyarti_Ned_Cox
Interviewed By: Monique La Fontaine
Translated By: Putuparri Tom Lawford
Location Recorded: Ngumpan
Latitude/Longitude: -18.76/126.03

Cultural Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on Use
Access: Public
Notes: This story was filmed with Putuparri Tom Lawford translating Ned Cox’s story in English for the camera.
Full transcript: Ned Cox [Tom Lawford translates as he speaks]: Kiki from the Dreamtime, Kiki was coming from the sky looking for a place to live, to stay, he was coming down, came down near Lake Gregory. He came down there, went down, went in the water and then he came out of the water when he was feeling hungry. Then he made all these plants to eat, feed, to eat, put them round everywhere, all kind of feeds, all different feeds for him to eat. He even put that feed for the people to eat too, but he put them feed there for him. If he felt hungry after travelling a long way from different places, he made all the plants, the plants grow. Some plants you can grind to make flour, the seeds you can make feed out of it. Some little grapes or something, what kind of feed …

Monique La Fontaine: Berries?

[Tom Lawford confers with Ned Cox in language.]

Unknown Woman: You can use blackfella name for plants, it’s good.

NC: This Kiki made all this feed and he put all them frogs, frogs that people eat, they dig into the sand, they dig em out, dig long way down to get one of those frog … [XX] … all kind of animals, bandicoots, blue tongue lizards, animals, that live out there now, or used to live out there. Lot of them are gone now, extinct, feed out there, what we still eat today from that old fella he made all the animals and plants for him to eat and for the people too, so the people can get a feed.

TL: And that other story he talked about is pearl shell, how pearl shell …

Male Interviewer: There’s another, another, just one moment please …

NC: Ready. Kiki had this stone in Dreamtime, he got a stone, it was white, stone, and he tried to hide it in the lake, that big lake now [Paruku, Lake Gregory], tried to hide it, that stone, inside the water but kept on coming up, floating up, kept on coming up. Trying to hide it somewhere, he still keep on coming up, floating up, you know, he put it down and walked away and it would come up again, then this other fella, other fella come along, other fella come along and found that thing floating in the water and took it, picked it up, took it, and he took it to Broome and chucked it, chucked it in the sea, in the ocean, and from there turned into pearl shell, that’s why we got too many pearl shells in the ocean, it started from Lake Gregory because it didn’t want to hide.

Dreamtime animal, man then, called bandicoot, bandicoot man, he took that [pearl shell], he stole it and he threw it in the ocean near Broome somewhere, and that’s why Broome is rich with pearls, and rest of the story, pearl come from Lake Gregory they kept floating up from the water and this other fella took it, threw in the ocean, that’s why they get pearls from Broome, they took it from here. That’s it.

Male Interviewer: That’s the story, let me just take some pictures of you two listening to …

[Ned Cox asks Tom Lawford to explain more about the mungari [medicine] too]

TL: All them feed, all them tucker that he put out for people, like for healing some, some healing stuff too, you get coldsick used for different plants for different ailments. You know if people got sores use different plant that’s why the old fella he made all that happen for the people.

Male Interviewer: Okay, now just watch Ned.

END


Video recording: Ngumpan Workshop 2008- Ned Cox, Parak, Nada Rawlins, Last Night, Dancing
Source: CSROH_178_Yanpiyarti_Ned_Cox
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Yanpiyarti Ned Cox; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Paruku

Non-Indigenous name: Lake Gregory
Historical name: Gregory's Salt Sea

Place description: Before white settlement, the Paruku (Lake Gregory) and Tjurabalan (Sturt Creek) regions comprised a centre of activity for both ancestral beings and river, lake and desert people.

Paruku is the traditional name of the vast lake system that appears on Canning's map as Gregory's Salt Sea (Lake Gregory on most modern maps). It was named after the first white explorer, Augustus Gregory, who came across it in 1856.

Paruku is a complex system of salt and freshwater lakes. Once part of a vast inland sea, 300,000 years ago it was 10 times bigger than its current size. The Country surrounding Paruku is abundant with ancestral stories and with plant, animal and bird life. It sustained a thriving pastoral industry, which first prompted the need for a stock route to the south.

In 2001 Tjurabalan people's native title rights were recognised by the Federal Court of Australia and an Indigenous Protected Area was declared over the Paruku region. Today traditional owners use painting and mapping to record the cultural and environmental values of their Country.

The Paruku lake system lies at the end of Tjurapalan Jukurrpa, a major Dreaming track, which binds many language groups over a wide area. The fertile country around the lake and river systems provided an abundant source of plant and animal life for local groups, and for desert peoples in times of drought. These groups met regularly at Paruku and Tjurabalan to trade and perform ceremonies.

By the early 1900s, however, the Country’s rich ecology had attracted the attention of pastoralists. The success of their operations would lead to the development of an overland stock route that would allow Billiluna cattle to be transported from Paruku to the south. Mobs (herds) of cattle from other parts of the East Kimberley would also be driven along the Canning Stock Route from Old Halls Creek to Wiluna.

Traditional knowledge: Desert people use sacred pearl shell objects, which are known to northern people as jakuli, in special ceremonies for making rain. Although pearl shell is found in the ocean, its origin in the Jukurrpa (the Dreamtime) is Paruku (Lake Gregory).

In the Jukurrpa the creation ancestor Kiki came down from the sky looking for a place to live and went into Paruku. Kiki had a shining white stone that he tried to hide in the lake, but it kept floating up to the surface. Bandicoot man was travelling past Paruku when he saw what he thought was a light shining in the middle of the lake. It was Kiki’s white stone. He stole it and threw it into the sea, where it turned into pearl shell.

The Wati Kujarra (Two Men) heroes collected a big bag of pearl shells from the sea. On their way back, lightning struck the bag and scattered the pearl shells across the Country. Since the Jukurrpa, pearl shells have been traded across the desert. Pearl shell items are used in rain-making ceremonies and other spiritual practices. They are also worn by men and women as decorative ornaments.

From the Dreamtime Kiki was coming from the sky looking for a place to stay. He came down near Paruku, went down in the water and then he came out of the water when he was feeling hungry. He made all these plants, put them round everywhere. All kind of different feeds for him to eat. He even put that feed for the people to eat too, but he put them feed there if he felt hungry after travelling a long way from different places. He made all the plants grow, some plants you can grind to make flour, the seeds you can make feed out of it, some little grapes or berries.

This Kiki made all this feed. And he put all them frogs that people eat. They dig into the sand, dig long way down to get one of those frog. All kind of animals, bandicoots, blue tongue lizards, animals that live out there now, or used to live out there, lot of them are gone now, extinct. What we still eat today is from that old fella. He made all the animals and plants for him to eat and for the people too, so the people can get a feed. All them tucker that he put out for people, some [is] healing stuff too. Different plants for different ailments. That’s why the old fella, he made all that happen for the people. (Yanpiyarti Ned Cox with Putuparri Tom Lawford, 2008)

Kiki had this stone in Dreamtime. It was [a] white stone, and he tried to hide it in the lake. [He] tried to hide that stone inside the water but [it] kept on coming up, floating up. He put it down and walked away and it would come up again. Then this other fella come along and found that thing floating in the water and took it. [He was a] man then, Bandicoot man. He picked it and he took it [and] threw it in the ocean near Broome somewhere, and that’s why Broome is rich with pearls. From there [it] turned into pearl shell. That’s why we got too many pearl shells in the ocean. It started from Paruku because it didn’t want to hide. (Yanpiyarti Ned Cox with Putuparri Tom Lawford, 2008)

Related art centre(s): Other

Media title: Paruku
Media creator: Nicole Ma
Date: 2010

Media description: Artists from Paruku Indigenous Protected Area paint their Country around the lake. Paruku is the traditional name of the vast lake system that appears on Canning’s map as Gregory’s Salt Sea (Lake Gregory on most modern maps). It was named after the first white explorer, Augustus Gregory, who came across it in 1856. Paruku is a complex system made up of both salt and freshwater lakes. Once part of a vast inland sea, 300,000 years ago it was 10 times bigger than its current size. The Country surrounding Paruku is abundant with ancestral stories and with plant, animal and bird life. It sustained a thriving pastoral industry, which first prompted the need for a stock route to the south. In 2001 Tjurabalan people’s native title rights were recognised by the Federal Court of Australia and an Indigenous Protected Area was declared over the Paruku region. Today traditional owners use painting and mapping to record the cultural and environmental values of their Country.
Media Copyright: FORM
Format: Video
Accession ID: 20131016_FORM_MIRA_B0089_0005

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

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