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Minyipuru

Mantararr Rosie Williams, Mulyatingki Marney, Jakayu Biljabu, Ngalangka Nola Taylor, Morika Biljabu

Martumili Artists - Minyipuru (Seven Sisters) [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: This is the Minyipuru (Seven Sisters) story, collected from Martumili artists in Punmu, 2009, and collated and transcribed by Monique La Fontaine.

Date: 2009-04
Art centre(s): Martumili Artists
Catalogue number: CSROH_287_Minyipuru
Date: 2009-04
Transcribed By: Monique La Fontaine
Location Recorded: Punmu
Latitude/Longitude: -22.042865/123.120883

Cultural Protocols: Public Access
Access: Public
Notes: This was recorded in transcript only by Monique La Fontaine asking Tom Lawford about the September 2008 Ngumpan workshop.
Full transcript: Minyipuru [Seven Sisters] story

The Martu story of the Seven Sisters originates in the Country around Roebourne and when they began travelling east on their long journey they were many more than seven. The Minyipuru were a big group of ladies including many sisters and mothers. At various places on their journey they lost members of their group until eventually only seven sisters remained.

This is the story told by Martu women, although in their words, ‘there are other stories for other sides’. Many different people have stories for Minyipuru.

The Minyipuru travelled close to Parnngurr where an important event took place in women’s law. From Parnngurr they flew to Kalypa, which is now Well 23. At Kalypa they met up with a large group of Jukurrpa men, the first time that men had ever seen women and women had seen men. The men tried to grab the ladies and the ladies chased them and hit them with their wana [hitting sticks]. Then they left, leaving the men lying there. There is a song and dance for this place called Marrkupayi and both men and women perform parts of the dance.

They continued dancing as they travelled to Katarru, now Well 24. And then they flew to Yurungu [on the eastern side of the CSR]. They flew from Yurungu and they turned and looked behind them and there was a group of other people, Niminjarra, who were travelling west. The Niminjarra were looking for Nganyangu’s wives, in a place called Pirrkanjil. Nganyangu became the bodyguard for Kumpupirntily, protecting people from Ngayurnangalku, the Jukurrpa cannibal people.

The ladies walked to Yurrunguny and Mungurlyi and then they flew to Nyipil, now Well 34, where they heard the sound of Kinyu howling. They heard Wulkartungara [a ladies’ song] and another song called Yaruparrupa. From Nyipil the Minyipuru flew to Yanjiwarra jurnu where they danced and near the desert oaks they left the mark of their dancing. The Minyipuru can be seen today as a group of trees between Nyipil and Kunawarritji.

The Minyipuru then flew to Pangkapirni between Wells 35 & 36, where the man Yurla who had been following them from Roebourne, finally caught up with them. The ladies watched him sleep and when he woke up he tried to grab one of them. The other ladies tried to help their sister escape, but they couldn’t free her. The ladies made Yurla collect wood for them and promised that they would stay with him. They teased him saying, ‘Come and get us!’ and he began to sing a man’s song and ran away happy, his heart was beating fast. But the ladies were tricking him and hid from him. They were floating in a long line in mid-air and he ran around trying to find their tracks. Finally they made a kumpu on his face, until he couldn’t see anything at all and then they were able to free their sister. Yurla couldn’t see anything, but he could hear the Seven Sisters giggling and laughing from somewhere above him. He got a janga, a ladder of wood, and tried to reach them but they just floated higher and then pushed the ladder over when he got too close. He became tired finally and fell down, crawling on his stomach. He crawled a long way and then slept, and while he was asleep, the Seven Sisters all flew away.

They took off flying to a place next to Lipuru, now Well 37, called Lurrungpungu where eventually Yurla caught up to them again. It was here that he tried to grab five of the ladies. From here the Seven Sisters took off again flying to Lunpu and then Majarral and then on to Marapinti near Kiwirrkurra where there are rocks sitting up like ladies. The ladies had a feed at Marapinti and then pierced their noses; this is what the word marapinti means.

Some of the other places where the Minyipuru stopped on their journey to Marapinti include Wantili claypan (near Well 25) and Tiwa, (Well 26). From there the ladies flew on to Jurntujurntu, (Well 30). Kukulyurr is a permanent water where the Minyipuru sat down to rest before travelling onwards. They also rested at Juntiwa [going west, towards Telfer] and at Pangkaringka and Karlajaru. They landed at Juntiwa when they were coming from Pangkaringka and they also stopped at Natawalu before continuing on their journey. They also stopped to rest at Kukulurrpa and Jarnu warla [a lake]. At Pankarlpa the man who was chasing the Seven Sisters caught one of the ladies.

END
Source: CSROH_287_Minyipuru
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Mantararr Rosie Williams, Mulyatingki Marney, Jakayu Biljabu, Ngalangka Nola Taylor, Morika Biljabu; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Yanjimi Peter Rowlands

Yanjimi Peter Rowlands - painting story [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Yanjimi Peter Rowlands tells a story for his painting. His painting is of his Dreaming story, half of the Seven Sisters Dreaming.

Date: 2009-03
Art centre(s): Martumili Artists
Catalogue number: CSROH_275_Yanjimi_Peter_Rowlands
Date: 2009-03
Location Recorded: Punmu
Latitude/Longitude: -22.042865/123.120883

Cultural Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on Use
Access: Public
Full transcript: Yanjimi Peter Rowlands: My name is Peter Rowlands, Yanjimi Rowlands, Martu call me Yanjimi. My old man told me about my Country and this is, and that’s why I’m painting my story about myself. And this painting I’m doing in my Dreamtime, how it was told that the women arrived and for the first time the mans seen ladies and for the ladies first time they seen mans too. They met up with the Seven Sisters and the ladies were whipping them, they got a hiding from them, in Dreamtime, all the mans. This picture is half of the story I’m painting, this story is half (women only allowed to know half). How all the men got whipped by the Seven Sisters, including me at a place called Wilpiripungkunja. I was in this story, this is my Dreamtime story [jarriny] for me I’m painting, and half of the story. My story is on the north side where they followed me and chased me and whacked them at the northern side of Kalypa. So I’m putting this yapu (rock) and warla (lake) small picture little warla. And part of the red sand is around Kalypa, pana (sand).

END
Source: CSROH_275_Yanjimi_Peter_Rowlands
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Yanjimi Peter Rowlands; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Jukuja Dolly Snell, Ngilpirr Spider Snell, Purlta Maryanne Downs, Manmarr Daisy Andrews, Amy Nuggett

Jukuja Dolly Snell, Ngilpirr Spider Snell, Purlta Maryanne Downs, Manmarr Daisy Andrews, Amy Nuggett - conversation notes [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: These are notes taken from a conversation at Mangkaja Arts Resource Agency between Jukuja Dolly Snell, Ngilpirr Spider Snell, Purlta Maryanne Downs, Manmarr Daisy Andrews, and Amy Nuggett.

Date: 2009-11
Art centre(s): Mangkaja Arts Resource Agency
Language spoken: Kriol, English
Catalogue number: CSROH_239_Mangkaja_Group_Discussion
Date: 2009-11
Transcribed By: Monique La Fontaine
Location Recorded: Fitzroy Crossing
Latitude/Longitude: -18.17/125.59

Cultural Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on Use
Access: Public
Full transcript: Group: [About drovers] Jinamungkurr, Spider’s sister, and Wakajiya were cookies [cooks] on the stock route.

Daisy Andrews: [On drover Tommy Bull, Mapariny Alan Dededar’s father] He was a good fuckin’ rider that old man!

Dolly Snell: [What the whitefellas used to say to old people who would work as drovers] You go get ‘em boot and whip — you goin’ Wiluna now!

Group: Mervyn Street was working in Wiluna. Raymond went with Carl Stein, station manager for Carnegie, down to Wiluna. He took most of his workers from Louisa Downs to Carnegie. Mervyn’s Gooniyandi brother went to Wiluna, kilaki side [on his paternal grandfather’s side] might be.

Hitler [Pamba – Nyuju Stumpy Brown’s second husband] was working Wiluna same time as Mervyn.

Purlta [Maryanne Downs] and Jarinyanu [David Downs] worked around Carnegie with Ben Taylor.

Amy Nugget – [Amy is mother for Rosie Williams and Dulcie Gibbs. Jakayu Biljabu is Amy’s daughter in law.]

Dolly Snell: We been sing that Minyipuru [Seven Sisters] song everywhere, long time, Wangkatjungka.

Spider Snell: Jarinyanu been puluman [bullock] drovin’. [Tommy] Bull, Jarinyanu [David Downs], Jamili [Chum Lee] – all working together Carnegie [Station].

[Spider and Jarinyanu mother’s name was Intiya.]

Maryanne Downs: My husband been grow ‘em up me from kid.

END
Source: CSROH_239_Mangkaja_Group_Discussion
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Jukuja Dolly Snell, Ngilpirr Spider Snell, Purlta Maryanne Downs, Manmarr Daisy Andrews, Amy Nuggett; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Mantararr Rosie Williams, Jugarda Dulcie Gibbs, Muni Rita Simpson

Mantararr Rosie Williams, Jugarda Dulcie Gibbs, Muni Rita Simpson - Minyipuru [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Mantararr Rosie Williams, Jugarda Dulcie Gibbs, Muni Rita Simpson tell the Jukurrpa story of their collaborative painting of the Minyipuru story.

Date: 2008
Art centre(s): Martumili Artists
Language spoken: Manyjilyjarra
Catalogue number: CSROH_151_Rosie_Williams_Dulcie Gibbs_Rita Simpson
Date: 2008

Cultural Protocols: Public Access - Verbal Consent
Access: Public
Notes: This is part of the painting story for the three sisters’ collaborative Minyipuru canvas; it is only a partial transcription of the video in interviews with added description from the video and information derived from other conversations. It is unclear who is speaking in the quoted sections of this transcript.
Full transcript: Painting 55: Minyipuru

This painting shows the waterholes related to the Jukurrpa story for Jalpulupulu, the Seven Sisters. The three artists are sisters and have many stories about these waterholes. Dulcie’s father lived around Kunawarratji (one of the waterholes depicted) with three or four wives.

The Dreamtime story of the Jalpulupulu starts at Nyilpirr where the Seven Sisters were all living. The youngest sister was being pursued by an old man who already had two wives. He chased the sisters all the way to Pankapirni, (where Rita, Rosie and Dulcie painted this canvas). At Pankapirni the Jalpulupulu climbed up a tree and told the old man to get them some wood. The old man made a ladder out of the wood and tried to reach them but when he climbed up they pushed the ladder over. ‘He had a rough time, poor old fella.’ The Seven Sisters just laughed at him and flew away.

The youngest sister wanted the old man too, so the older sisters let her go to him. But they tricked him; when he fell asleep they took her back and flew all the way to Malapinti near Kiwirrkurra without stopping. The Seven Sisters began their travels all the way from Roebourne side. ‘From that rock that stands up in the sea. That old man was following from there, right up to here.’

END
Video format: DVD/miniDV/QuickTime movie
Video recording: 7 IV - Well 36
Source: CSROH_151_Rosie_Williams_Dulcie Gibbs_Rita Simpson
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Mantararr Rosie Williams, Jugarda Dulcie Gibbs, Muni Rita Simpson; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Nora Wompi

Nora Wompi - five painting stories [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Nora Wompi tells five painting stories.

Date: 2008-04-01
Art centre(s): Martumili Artists
Language spoken: Martu Wangka
Catalogue number: CSROH_114_Nora_Wompi
Date: 2008-04-01
Translated By: Ngalangka Nola Taylor
Location Recorded: Kunawarritji (Well 33)
Latitude/Longitude: -22.32/124.72

Cultural Protocols: Public Access - Verbal Consent
Access: Public
Full transcript: 91x91cm Papul – painting story

This is where the eagle was eating the baby kangaroo and then kept on going, see T353 on 21/04/08. Painting also shows Kartarru.

T353 – painting story

This is a rockhole called Wanmulpungku (lit. tearing it apart).

This is Pupul, it’s on the other side of Jariyaltu [Jariyaltu is close to the road between Punmu and Kunawarritji, from Kunawarritji, the ‘other side’ is the western side].

This is Wapungukurangu [?], [belonging to the eagle]. The eagle was eating kangaroo here. There’s a big snake here.

This is Jarj, it’s northeast of Kunawarritji.

Right next to [the well at] Kunawarritji there used to be a yinta with a snake, Kunawarritji is a jila. [The old soak is very close to the windmill, tank etc].

The eagle took half of the kangaroo [from Wapungukurangu] and carried it to Jarrayatung, where it finished eating it.

In the Dreamtime, the eagle used to eat little joeys and other baby animals. The Eagle used to travel back and forth, taking little ones, tearing them apart and eating them. That Eagle used to eat the little joeys. It used to travel along, and stop in places like Juntujuntu on the Canning Stock Route.

T353 – Painting 135 – painting story

This is a rockhole that was made in the Dreamtime. These – the Kanapurta – are the stars in the sky, which have been there since the Dreamtime. [Nola: in the Seven Sisters story, all the people who went up into the sky are Kanapurta, they are stars now].

I was a little baby here at the rockholes of Kunawarritji and Naturri. I also lived around the rockholes I said before [i.e. Wanmulpungku [lit. tearing it apart], Pupul, Jariyaltu, Jarj, Jarrayatung]. Naturri lies to the west of Kunawarritji, it’s a jurnu [a soak]. There are other stories for those places, but I don’t want to talk about them. They are kurunnyirrin [closed]. I painted all the little hills around that area, in the Dreamtime, they were all squeezed out of the soft earth, people made them.

[Wompi painted several kinds of berries in amongst the Dreamtime story of the rockholes and hills:]

Minyiri is a special kind of berry from the sandhills. We also used to get jinjiwirni and kampurangu [both bush berries]. We also got mangarta [quandongs] at Walawala. They’re good tucker.

Notes from recording T353 – painting story

Walawala jila used to be a yinta (permanent water source) but th e whitefellas dug it up and used it as a well. Kunkun, which features in this painting. The story for this Country is the Marlu Jukurrpa (Kangaroo Dreaming). Yunapayi jila is a permanent source which was made in the Dreamtime by the Seven Sisters. The painting also contains Yarturti (a lake) and Mulyakurtu, another permanent water source. These water sources are situated in warrarn, open Country, where people can see a long way.

[Description: The darkest blue set of nesting rectangles represents Walawala jila. If the painting is orientated so that Walawala is in the top left hand corner, then a straight orange bar, situated immediately below an orange bar and a set of semi-circles represent Kunkun. At the very bottom of the painting, on the left hand side, is Yunapayi jila. On the right hand edge of the painting, the orange rectangle is Mulyakurtu yinta, and the rectangle immediately below, with the pale blue centre, is Yarturti.]

T357 – Seven Sisters Story – painting story

Yurla was chasing after the Seven Sisters. The Seven Sisters can be seen [today] in the form of a group of trees between Nyipil and Kunawarritji [these appear in the painting]. The Seven Sisters made a kumbu [urinated] near the camp. They grabbed hold of the man [Yurla].

At Parnkapini: The man was sleeping flat out, with his belly on the ground. He made a ladder to climb to get to the Seven Sisters who were up above him. They would wait for him to climb up a little and then they would push his ladder over and watch him fall. The ladies – the Seven Sisters – who came from Roebourne, they watched the man sleeping [he used to sleep flat out, with his belly on the ground].

The man got up from his sleep, made a kumbu near his camp. He grabbed hold of one of the women and he slept with her [raped her]. The other ladies tried to help their sister escape, but they couldn’t free her. They stood in a long line and teased the man. Then they made a kumbu on the man, on his face, until he couldn’t see anything at all and then they were able to free their sister. Yurla couldn’t see anything, but he could hear the seven sisters giggling and laughing from somewhere above him. They were in the sky, calling and teasing him, but whenever he went close to them they pushed him over. He still couldn’t see anything and they could just knock him down.

Yurla got up suddenly and ran after the women, trying to get a hold of any one of them, but they pushed him to the ground again. They waited on top of a sandhill and he stayed on the low ground, looking up at them. They kept on teasing him and he was still trying to grab any one of them. He became tired and fell down and then he crawled on his stomach. He crawled a long way and then slept, and while he was asleep, the Seven Sisters all flew away.

They flew from here to Lurunpunkunja, but the man didn’t know that. He looked around but couldn’t see them anywhere. Then he got up and walked towards the east. He was trying and trying and trying [this is the song at the end].

All the other things in this picture are trees.

END
Source: CSROH_114_Nora_Wompi
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Nora Wompi; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Yanjimi Peter Rowlands

Yanjimi Peter Rowlands - Jukurrpa, Country, life history [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Yanjimi Peter Rowlands talks about his Country, life history, Jukurrpa and jarriny.

Date: 2008-04-01
Art centre(s): Martumili Artists
Language spoken: Martu Wangka
Catalogue number: CSROH_87_Yanjimi_Peter_Rowlands
Date: 2008-04-01
Transcribed By: Ngalangka Nola Taylor
Location Recorded: Kunawarritji (Well 33)
Latitude/Longitude: -22.34188/124.77525

Cultural Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on Use
Access: Public
Full transcript: Yanjimi Peter Rowlands: My name is Peter Rowlands and my bush name is Yanjimi. My father told me about Kalypa (Well 23) and today I am painting the Dreamtime Story for this Country [Well 23]. The Seven Sisters were travelling from the west towards the east and they met up with a group of men who were doing their law business. [Something occurred between the women and the men and] the Seven Sisters started to whip the men. Some of the men ran away and the Seven Sisters continued to hit those men who remained. This is my Jukurrpa. My jarriny (totem) is Wirlpiripungu [one of the men who was sitting down doing men’s business in the Seven Sisters story].

[pointing to his painting]: This is a rock. I am painting a little lake next to the rock.

I was born here [pointing to painting], in Kalypa (Well 23). I grew up and went to school in Jigalong mission. My grandparents and parents told me who I was and where I come from. They said that I was from Wirlpiripungu, close to Kalypa, on the Canning Stock Route [note: Wirlpiripungu is a place, Yanjimi’s jarriny and a subject in the Seven Sisters story] [note added 24/4/09: Wirlpiripungu – really it is Wania-wiyarajarru [?]]. The Seven Sisters came in from Wangkakulu [lit: coming to tell you something]. They danced around Well 21 before they flew towards the north east. That’s why I am painting my Country and the Jukurrpa.

My father told me story about the time he found a wireless radio on the Canning Stock Route. He didn’t know what it was, but while he was looking at it and he accidentally turned it on. He heard a noise that sounded like a voice. He was very frightened and they threw the radio and ran away. Yanjimi’s father went and got some other Martu men. They thought that the radio was the spirit of a white person; that a white person had turned into that thing. The men threw sand at it and yelled at it to go away, they stood around it with their spears and tried burying it, but it was still talking. The men dug it up and began hitting and spearing it, and eventually broke it into pieces.

My father told me that they had killed a man, but really, it was only a wireless radio. But at that time, Martu people were wondering who it [the radio spirit] was.

[They were only young fellas at this time on Maliki - doing law]

I was three years old when my parents took me into Jigalong mission. [about 1947 or 1948]

When they were laying out the Canning Stock Route, whitefellas used to get Martu people to show them where the permanent water was. When they built the stock route, it was Martu who dug the wells. The whitefellas was asking Martu people to show them permanent water, like soaks and rockholes, for a shortcut from Wiluna to Billiluna. When the whitefellas found out where the permanent water was, they made wells in every place and they called it the Canning Stock Route. That was how they went cut-across.

I was small and as I became a man my father told me about my birth place and my family’s Country. My mother’s Country is up north, [Hayley’s 1st transcription: Gugabunnah, 2nd: Nudbawallu]. Father’s Country side is Wirnpa and Yimiri, around Lake Percival. My dad used to tell me my mother’s language, [Hayley: Warmajardil]. My grandmother is still living in Jigalong, but my other grandmother died on the Canning Stock Route, she was coming behind to Talawana. My father told me my birthplace. You go north to get to my Country. My grandmother’s brother [Joan Fatima’s father?] is in Wiluna.

I am painting this story to tell whitefellas and younger people …

[Other people for Lake Disappointment are Mark Jeffries (Jigalong) and Paddy Collie [spelling?], none of these men are painters. Note that Yanjimi gave this narrative prior to the heritage surveys for the mining of Lake Disappointment]

END
Source: CSROH_87_Yanjimi_Peter_Rowlands
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Yanjimi Peter Rowlands; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Seven Sisters

Seven Sisters' - Nangkatji Josephine Nangala. Catalogue Reference: JN/28/PT. Canning Stock Route bush trip 1- 4 August 2007.

Date created: 8/3/2007
Photographer: Tim Acker
Location: Well 36, Kilykily
Latitude/Longitude: -22.13954/125.28315

People: Nangkatji Josephine Nangala
Art Centre(s): Papunya Tula Artists

Copyright: FORM
Format: Image
Category: Image
Source: 6 Canning Stock Route bush trip 1-4 August 07
Accession ID: 20131213_B0005_0085

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Seven Sisters

Story:The Martu story of the Seven Sisters, or Minyipuru, originates in the Country around Roebourne. When the Minyipuru began travelling east on their long journey they were many more than seven; they began as a big group of ladies, including many sisters and mothers, but at various places on their journey they lost members of their group until eventually only seven sisters remained. The Seven Sisters or Minyipuru are associated with the Pleides star constellation. This is the story of the Seven Sisters as told by Martu women, although in their words, ‘there are other stories for other sides’, as many language groups have other stories and other names for the Seven Sisters. The story of the Seven Sisters is also known around the world and can be found in countries including Japan, Greece, Africa and China. In the Martu version, the Minyipuru were travelling close to Parnngurr where an important event took place in women’s law. From Parnngurr they flew to Kalypa, which is now Well 23. At Kalypa they met up with a large group of Jukurrpa men, the first time that men had ever seen women and women had seen men. The men tried to grab the ladies and the ladies chased them and hit them with their wana (hitting sticks). Then they left, leaving the men lying there. There is a song and dance for this place called Marrkupayi, and both men and women perform parts of the dance. They continued dancing as they travelled to Katarru, now Well 24. And then they flew to Yurungu (on the eastern side of the Canning Stock Route). As they flew from Yurungu, they turned and looked behind them and there was a group of other people, Niminjarra, who were travelling west. The Niminjarra were looking for Nganyangu’s wives, in a place called Pirrkanjil. Nganyangu became the bodyguard for Kumpupirntily [Lake Disappointment], protecting people from Ngayurnangalku, the Jukurrpa cannibal people. The ladies walked to Yurrunguny and Mungurlyi and then they flew to Nyipil, now Well 34, where they heard the sound of Kinyu howling. They heard Wulkartungara [a ladies’ song] and another song called Yaruparrupa. From Nyipil, the Minyipuru flew to Yanjiwarra jurnu where they danced, and near the desert oaks they left the mark of their dancing. The Minyipuru can be seen today as a group of trees between Nyipil and Kunawarritji. The Minyipuru then flew to Pangkapini between Wells 35 and 36, where the man Yurla, who had been following them from Roebourne, finally caught up with them. The ladies watched him sleep, and when he woke up he tried to grab one of them. The other ladies tried to help their sister escape, but they couldn’t free her. The ladies made Yurla collect wood for them and promised that they would stay with him. They teased him saying, ‘Come and get us!’, and he began to sing a man’s song and ran away happy, his heart was beating fast. But the ladies were tricking him and hid from him. They were floating in a long line in mid-air and he ran around trying to find their tracks. Yurla could hear the Seven Sisters giggling and laughing from somewhere above him; when he looked up they were teasing him, so he got a janga, a ladder of wood, and tried to reach them but they just floated higher and pushed the ladder over when he got too close. He finally became tired and fell down, crawling on his stomach. He crawled a long way and then slept, and while he was asleep, the Seven Sisters all flew away. They took off flying to a place next to Lipuru, now Well 37, called Lurrungpungu where eventually Yurla caught up to them again. It was here that he tried to grab five of the ladies. From here the Seven Sisters took off again flying to Lunpu and then Majarral and then on to Marapinti near Kiwirrkurra, where there are rocks sitting up like ladies. The ladies had a feed at Marapinti and then pierced their noses: this is what the word marapinti means. Some of the other places where the Minyipuru stopped on their journey to Marapinti include Wantili claypan (near Well 25) and Tiwa, (Well 26). From there the ladies flew on to Juntujuntu, (Well 30). Kukulyurr is a permanent water where the Minyipuru sat down to rest before travelling onwards. They also rested at Juntiwa [going west, towards Telfer] and at Pangkaringka and Karlajaru. They landed at Juntiwa when they were coming from Pangkaringka, and they also stopped at Natawalu before continuing on their journey. They also stopped to rest at Kukulurrpa and Jarnu warla (a lake).

Media Creator:Curtis Taylor

Media date: 2010

Media Description:Parnngurr Nyiru tells the story of the Minyipuru or Seven Sisters who travelled through Parnngurr in the Dreamtime, followed by the man Nyiru (also known as Yurla), who had been pursuing them from Roebourne.

Story contributor(s):Mantararr Rosie Williams, Mulyatingki Marney, Jakayu Biljabu, Ngalangka Nola Taylor, Morika Biljabu

Art Centre(s): Martumili Artists
Publisher: FORM
Media copyright: Curtis Taylor
Accession ID:DATE_FORM_MIRA_B0098_0003

This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Video Title: Parnngurr Nyiru

Video Description: Parnngurr Nyiru tells the story of the Minyipuru or Seven Sisters who travelled through Parnngurr in the Dreamtime, followed by the man Nyiru, who had been pursuing them from Roebourne. Curtis Taylor’s short films about his home community of Parnngurr describe the return of Martu people to their homelands, and the stories of the Country from its origin in the Dreamtime.

Date created: 2010
Art Centre(s): Martumili Artists, CSR Project

Director: Curtis Taylor
Editor: Brandt Lee, Curtis Taylor
Camera: Curtis Taylor, Dave Wells
Narrator: Kumpaya Girgiba
Translator: Curtis Taylor
Executive Producer: FORM

Rights: © Curtis Taylor, 2010
Clip length: 0:01:05
Protocols: PUBLIC ACCESS
Format: Video
Source: Screen 4 Video
Category: Video
Accession ID: 20130920_FORM_MIRA_B0023_0004

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Marapinti

Artist(s): Nankatji Josephine Nangala

Date created: 2008
Art Centre(s): Papunya Tula Artists
Size: 90.4x60.8
Medium: acrylic on linen

Artwork Story: Marapinti is a rock hole west of Kiwirrkurra, and the easternmost point on the Seven Sisters’ journey across Martu Country. As they travelled, singing and dancing towards Pintupi Country, the Minyipuru created waters and landforms. On reaching Marapinti, they pierced their noses, a practice known as marapinti. Today the Minyipuru can be seen there as a group of rocks, sitting up like women.

Location depicted: Marapinti (rock hole west of Kiwirrkurra)

Artwork copyright: ©2013 Nankatji Josephine Nangala
Catalogue ID: JN/223/PT
Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on use

Photographer: Jason McCarthy
Photograph date: 2009-05-15
Photography copyright: National Museum of Australia
Format: Image
Category: Artwork

Artist(s) biography:
born about 1950
Kukatja, Manyjilyjarra language groups
Nangala skin group
Kiwirrkurra community
Papunya Tula Artists
Josephine grew up with her family travelling between Nyirla, her traditional Country, and the Canning Stock Route. In 1957 she was living around Natawalu when a helicopter landed and took her sick aunt and her brother-in-law to Balgo mission. Josephine and her family eventually followed on foot. She later moved to Kiwirrkurra community with her husband, Charlie Wallabi (Walapayi) Tjungurrayi.

Accession ID: 20131014_FORM_MIRA_B0045_0089

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

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