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ngayurnangalku

Kumpupirntily

Story:Nyayurnangalku [cannibal beings] live below the surface of the lake in a world lit by its own sun. The Nyayurnangalku are said to resemble people, except for their large fangs and the long curved fingernails they use to catch and hold their victims. They block the wind as they move across the lake in search of human prey. Aboriginal people only travel past the lake when the wind is blowing. When boomerang-shaped clouds called wilany appear in the sky, it is a sign that the Ngayurnangalku are approaching. Aboriginal people are also careful not to light fires near Kumpupirntily, in case it signals their presence to the Ngayurnangalku. The cannibals’ own fires are scattered across the surface of the lake. An immensely powerful force lies at the centre of the lake. Aboriginal people believe it is capable of pulling planes and helicopters down from the sky, and they avoid flying directly over the area. During the Dreamtime an important gathering of Ngayurnangalku took place at Kumpupirntily. They came from Natawalu (Well 40) and Yunpu in the north, from Mundiwindi in the west, and from the country around Kiwirrkurra in the east. They came to decide whether or not they should continue to live as cannibals. Jeffrey James continues the story: 'Everybody agrees: alright we better stop eating the peoples. Then that night there was a baby [girl] born from that other group [eastern mob] … And they asked the newborn baby, and she said no: "We can still carry on and continue eating peoples." But [western] mob said "No, we’re not going to touch."' Following the baby, one group continued to be cannibals, dividing the Ngayurnangalku forever into ‘good’ and ‘bad’. The bad people remained at Kumpupirntily, but the good were kept safe by ‘bodyguards’. 'The bodyguards were saving all the people. Sandhill in the middle of the lake separates good people and bad people.' Painting Catalogue Number: JB/DS/73/MM, BA/194/MM, PR/198/MM, PR/212/MM

Media Creator:Painting by Yunkurra Billy Atkins, Photo by Ross Swanborough

Media date: 2008
Story Location: Kumpupirntily (Lake Disappointment)

Media Description:It’s dangerous, that Country. I’ve seen that [cannibal] man, he’s there and I know it. I don’t know how white people go over there. If they were to run into him he would eat them straight out. Kumpupirntily, that’s a no good place … leave it alone and have nothing to do with it at all. Just leave it how it is.' (Yunkurra Billy Atkins)

Story contributor(s):Jeffrey James, Yunkurra Billy Atkins, John Carty, Clifford Brooks

Art Centre(s): Martumili Artists
Publisher: FORM
Media copyright: Yunkurra Billy Atkins, Ross Swanborough
Source: CSROH_17B
Accession ID:20131024_FORM_MIRA_B0046_0006

This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Kumpupirntily

Non-Indigenous name: Lake Disappointment

Traditional knowledge: Lake Disappointment [is where] that Jukurrpa come in. Ngayurnangalku [cannibal beings]. South of Balgo, they was all travelling, kakarra [eastern] mob and the west mob joined in from west of Well 40. They met up together and they all travelled together, getting all the people, killing them and eating them all. Ngayurnangalku. [The eastern Ngayurnangalku] got [to Kumpupirntily] first and they stop and wait there with their mothers, waiting for this mob to come in, west mob … This mob come in now, they all got to sit down together, meet up together, Ngayurnangalku.

They all cried together, the family, and they had a big meeting there. All ask one another questions. "What are we going to do? Are we going to stop killing the peoples and eating ’em?" They asked everybody, everybody in the reserve, kids and all, ladies and all, mens and everybody … Everybody agrees. "Alright, we better stop eating the peoples." Then that night there was a baby born from that [eastern] group, that other side here … "Oh, missing one over there. Young girl had a baby". And they asked the baby, newborn baby, and he said, "No".

That’s it, come back and tell this mob here, "The little kid said no. We can still carry on and continue eating peoples." But this [west] mob said, "No, we’re not going to touch". Mother and a father was there and two sons. That’s the bodyguard, saving all the people. He can save them too. This one here [sandhill where the bodyguards live], you can go through on that. Yeah, bad people, and the good peoples on this side, west side. Lake Disappointment. Kumpupirntily people, yeah. Kumpupirntily his name, Lake Disappointment whitefella name. (Jeffrey James, 2007)

Little baby girl. And they ask him, "Are we going to stay one and eat only malu [wallaby] and animals?" Little wanti [girl] says, "No, we going to eat human too". Little baby been say, "Hmm! Mm!" [Like a hiccup,] "Yes, keep eating them".

They started round Maraminda side and went on their knees and wailed all the way to Lake Disappointment. Ngayumangalku travelled all the way to Savory Creek from east and west, stopped at Jilakuru and near Puntuwarri. They travelled from long way and stopped at Lake Disappointment. (Jakayu Biljabu, 2009)

I’m not going over there. It’s dangerous, that Country. When whitefellas tell me to go there, I’m not going. I’ve seen that [cannibal] man. He’s there and I know it. [My parents] told us, "When you go there, you’ll see a light. Only can go there when the wind can blow". When the wind is blowing we can go there, can go past. If the wind stops you can’t go any further, because he’s there. When the wind stops, it’s no good. That’s what the old people were telling us …

My grandfather went to Lake Disappointment chasing the dingo and he heard an old woman making a noise like howling, but she was crying for that dingo that my grandfather was spearing and chasing. So, that woman grabbed his arm and put her long sharp fingernail through his wrist and paralysed him. She put her fingernail right through his wrist. Then that cannibal took him to a group of other cannibals, ready to cook him up to eat. They took him and had him there and they were singing him first. My grandfather is a strong maparn [magic] man. Lucky for him. He got out of there, because of his strength as a maparn. (Yunkurra Billy Atkins, 2008)

You can kill them and cut them up and they put themselves back together again. They a magic people. Just like a Terminator. They can eat you. I don’t want to go there. They live underground. (Kilalapari Butcher Wise, 2009)

You know, when they’re travelling from north [the drovers], they just take all the spinifex and put him in there [in the horse-bell]. No noise. Only bullock can make a noise, "Boo". They tell us, "Don’t make a fire". You know, "Don’t make a spinifex light," otherwise Ngayurnangalku will be making a fire again. Yeah. Giving a sign. (Billy Patch (Mr P), 2007)

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Related art centre(s): Other

Media title: Kumpupirntily (Lake Disappointment)
Media creator: Tim Acker
Date: 2007

Media description: Kumpupirntily (Lake Disappointment)
Media Copyright: FORM
Format: Image
Accession ID: FORM_MIRA_B0088_0010

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Lake Disappointment

Artist(s): Yanjimi Peter Rowlands

Date created: 2008
Art Centre(s): Martumili Artists
Size: 75x36
Medium: acrylic on canvas

Artwork Story: From there Nganyangu lived and walked in with other Ngayurnangalku and he became a bodyguard for the good people from Ngayurnangalku … with his two wife and his two sons … They all the bodyguards, they all maparn people.

Artwork copyright: ©2013 Yanjimi Peter Rowlands
Catalogue ID: PR/198/MM
Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on use

Photographer: Jason McCarthy
Photograph date: 2008-09-06
Photography copyright: National Museum of Australia
Format: Image
Category: Artwork

Artist(s) biography:
born about 1944
Manyjilijarra, Kartujarra language groups
Purungu skin group
Parnngurr community
Martumili Artists
Yanjimi was born at Kalypa (Well 23) on the Canning Stock Route and his Dreaming is associated with the Seven Sisters story for this site. In 1948 his family moved in to Jigalong mission. He now lives in Parnngurr with his wife and children. Yanjimi visited Singapore in 2008 as a member of the first group of Martu artists to hold an international art exhibition.

Accession ID: 20131014_FORM_MIRA_B0045_0068

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Kumpupirntily

Artist(s): Yanjimi Peter Rowlands

Date created: 2008
Art Centre(s): Martumili Artists
Size: 150x106.5
Medium: acrylic on canvas

Artwork Story: When some Ngayurnangalku decided they would keep eating people, their kind was forever after divided into the ‘good’ and the ‘bad’. The bad remained cannibals at Kumpupirntily; the good were kept safe by ancestral ‘bodyguards’, who became landforms around the lake. Yanjimi’s painting describes the story of the bodyguard Nganyangu, the ancestral bush turkey. No more of this story can be revealed.

Artwork copyright: ©2013 Yanjimi Peter Rowlands
Catalogue ID: PR/212/MM
Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on use

Photographer: Jason McCarthy
Photograph date: 2009-06-17
Photography copyright: National Museum of Australia
Format: Image
Category: Artwork

Artist(s) biography:
born about 1944
Manyjilijarra, Kartujarra language groups
Purungu skin group
Parnngurr community
Martumili Artists
Yanjimi was born at Kalypa (Well 23) on the Canning Stock Route and his Dreaming is associated with the Seven Sisters story for this site. In 1948 his family moved in to Jigalong mission. He now lives in Parnngurr with his wife and children. Yanjimi visited Singapore in 2008 as a member of the first group of Martu artists to hold an international art exhibition.
Artwork Diagram: kumpupirntily_yanjimi_peter_rowlands_detail

Accession ID: 20131014_FORM_MIRA_B0045_0081

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Kumpupirntily

Artist(s): Jakayu Biljabu and Dadda Samson

Date created: 2007
Art Centre(s): Martumili Artists
Size: 122x77
Medium: acrylic on linen

Artwork Story: The Ngayurnangalku started round Mundawindi side. They went on their knees and wailed and crawled all the way to Lake Disappointment. Ngayurnangalku travelled all the way to Savory Creek from east and west. They stopped at Jilakurru and near Puntawarri. They travelled from long way, and stopped at Kumpupirntily.

Location depicted: Ngayurnangalku journey to Kumpupirntily
Place of creation: Well 36
Latitude/Longitude: -22.13954/125.28315

Artwork copyright: ©2013 Jakayu Biljabu and Dadda Samson
Catalogue ID: JB/DS/73/MM
Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on use

Photographer: Jason McCarthy
Photograph date: 2009-05-18
Photography copyright: National Museum of Australia
Format: Image
Category: Artwork

Artist(s) biography: Jakayu Biljabu born about 1937 Manyjilyjarra language group, Purungu skin group Punmu community Martumili Artists Jakayu was born near Pitu, east of Well 25, and grew up around Kunawarritji, Rarrki and Nyilangkurr, where her father died. In 1963, with her husband and extended family, she met the surveyor Len Beadell, who was grading roads for the Woomera rocket range. This meeting prompted them to join their relatives who were living at Jigalong mission. In 1982 Jakayu moved to Punmu community, where she lives today with her children and grandchildren. Dadda Samson born about 1939 Kartujarra language group, Milangka skin group Jigalong community Martumili Artists Before Dadda was born, her parents and brothers lived in the Country around Jilakurru (Well 17). In the late 1930s, as droving traffic intensified, her family relocated west to old Jigalong, the ration station established on the rabbit-proof fence. Dadda was born by the windmill there. She still lives in Jigalong and is one of the pioneering painters at Martumili Artists.

Accession ID: 20131011_FORM_MIRA_B0044_0064

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Title: Kumpupirntily
Artist(s): Jakayu Biljabu and Dadda Samson

Date created: 2007
Art Centre(s): Martumili Artists
Size: 122x77
Medium: acrylic on linen

Artwork Story: ["The Ngayurnangalku started round Mundawindi side. They went on their knees and wailed and crawled all the way to Lake Disappointment. Ngayurnangalku travelled all the way to Savory Creek from east and west. They stopped at Jilakurru and near Puntawarri. They travelled from long way, and stopped at Kumpupirntily."]

Location depicted: Ngayurnangalku journey to Kumpupirntily
Place of creation: Well 36
Latitude/Longitude: -22.13954/125.28315

Artwork copyright: ©2013 Jakayu Biljabu and Dadda Samson
Catalogue ID: JB/DS/73/MM
Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on use

Photographer: Jason McCarthy
Photograph date: 5/18/2009
Photography copyright: NMA
Format: Image
Category: Artwork

Artist(s) biography:
Jakayu Biljabu
born about 1937
Manyjilyjarra language group, Purungu skin group
Punmu community
Martumili Artists
Jakayu was born near Pitu, east of Well 25, and grew up around Kunawarritji, Rarrki and Nyilangkurr, where her father died. In 1963, with her husband and extended family, she met the surveyor Len Beadell, who was grading roads for the Woomera rocket range. This meeting prompted them to join their relatives who were living at Jigalong mission. In 1982 Jakayu moved to Punmu community, where she lives today with her children and grandchildren.

Dadda Samson
born about 1939
Kartujarra language group, Milangka skin group
Jigalong community
Martumili Artists
Before Dadda was born, her parents and brothers lived in the Country around Jilakurru (Well 17). In the late 1930s, as droving traffic intensified, her family relocated west to old Jigalong, the ration station established on the rabbit-proof fence. Dadda was born by the windmill there. She still lives in Jigalong and is one of the pioneering painters at Martumili Artists.

Accession ID: 20131011_FORM_MIRA_B0044_0064

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

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