Browse by

Browse by art centre

story

Mantararr Rosie Williams, Mulyatingki Marney, Jakayu Biljabu, Ngalangka Nola Taylor, Morika Biljabu

Martumili Artists - Minyipuru (Seven Sisters) [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: This is the Minyipuru (Seven Sisters) story, collected from Martumili artists in Punmu, 2009, and collated and transcribed by Monique La Fontaine.

Date: 2009-04
Art centre(s): Martumili Artists
Catalogue number: CSROH_287_Minyipuru
Date: 2009-04
Transcribed By: Monique La Fontaine
Location Recorded: Punmu
Latitude/Longitude: -22.042865/123.120883

Cultural Protocols: Public Access
Access: Public
Notes: This was recorded in transcript only by Monique La Fontaine asking Tom Lawford about the September 2008 Ngumpan workshop.
Full transcript: Minyipuru [Seven Sisters] story

The Martu story of the Seven Sisters originates in the Country around Roebourne and when they began travelling east on their long journey they were many more than seven. The Minyipuru were a big group of ladies including many sisters and mothers. At various places on their journey they lost members of their group until eventually only seven sisters remained.

This is the story told by Martu women, although in their words, ‘there are other stories for other sides’. Many different people have stories for Minyipuru.

The Minyipuru travelled close to Parnngurr where an important event took place in women’s law. From Parnngurr they flew to Kalypa, which is now Well 23. At Kalypa they met up with a large group of Jukurrpa men, the first time that men had ever seen women and women had seen men. The men tried to grab the ladies and the ladies chased them and hit them with their wana [hitting sticks]. Then they left, leaving the men lying there. There is a song and dance for this place called Marrkupayi and both men and women perform parts of the dance.

They continued dancing as they travelled to Katarru, now Well 24. And then they flew to Yurungu [on the eastern side of the CSR]. They flew from Yurungu and they turned and looked behind them and there was a group of other people, Niminjarra, who were travelling west. The Niminjarra were looking for Nganyangu’s wives, in a place called Pirrkanjil. Nganyangu became the bodyguard for Kumpupirntily, protecting people from Ngayurnangalku, the Jukurrpa cannibal people.

The ladies walked to Yurrunguny and Mungurlyi and then they flew to Nyipil, now Well 34, where they heard the sound of Kinyu howling. They heard Wulkartungara [a ladies’ song] and another song called Yaruparrupa. From Nyipil the Minyipuru flew to Yanjiwarra jurnu where they danced and near the desert oaks they left the mark of their dancing. The Minyipuru can be seen today as a group of trees between Nyipil and Kunawarritji.

The Minyipuru then flew to Pangkapirni between Wells 35 & 36, where the man Yurla who had been following them from Roebourne, finally caught up with them. The ladies watched him sleep and when he woke up he tried to grab one of them. The other ladies tried to help their sister escape, but they couldn’t free her. The ladies made Yurla collect wood for them and promised that they would stay with him. They teased him saying, ‘Come and get us!’ and he began to sing a man’s song and ran away happy, his heart was beating fast. But the ladies were tricking him and hid from him. They were floating in a long line in mid-air and he ran around trying to find their tracks. Finally they made a kumpu on his face, until he couldn’t see anything at all and then they were able to free their sister. Yurla couldn’t see anything, but he could hear the Seven Sisters giggling and laughing from somewhere above him. He got a janga, a ladder of wood, and tried to reach them but they just floated higher and then pushed the ladder over when he got too close. He became tired finally and fell down, crawling on his stomach. He crawled a long way and then slept, and while he was asleep, the Seven Sisters all flew away.

They took off flying to a place next to Lipuru, now Well 37, called Lurrungpungu where eventually Yurla caught up to them again. It was here that he tried to grab five of the ladies. From here the Seven Sisters took off again flying to Lunpu and then Majarral and then on to Marapinti near Kiwirrkurra where there are rocks sitting up like ladies. The ladies had a feed at Marapinti and then pierced their noses; this is what the word marapinti means.

Some of the other places where the Minyipuru stopped on their journey to Marapinti include Wantili claypan (near Well 25) and Tiwa, (Well 26). From there the ladies flew on to Jurntujurntu, (Well 30). Kukulyurr is a permanent water where the Minyipuru sat down to rest before travelling onwards. They also rested at Juntiwa [going west, towards Telfer] and at Pangkaringka and Karlajaru. They landed at Juntiwa when they were coming from Pangkaringka and they also stopped at Natawalu before continuing on their journey. They also stopped to rest at Kukulurrpa and Jarnu warla [a lake]. At Pankarlpa the man who was chasing the Seven Sisters caught one of the ladies.

END
Source: CSROH_287_Minyipuru
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Mantararr Rosie Williams, Mulyatingki Marney, Jakayu Biljabu, Ngalangka Nola Taylor, Morika Biljabu; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Ngamayu Ngamaru Bidu

Ngamayu Ngamaru Bidu - Dreamtime story [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Ngamayu Ngamaru Bidu tells a Dreamtime story of people who flew away.

Date: 2008-04
Art centre(s): Martumili Artists
Language spoken: Martu Wangka
Catalogue number: CSROH_286_Ngamayu_Ngamaru_Bidu
Date: 2008-04
Transcribed By: Ngalangka Nola Taylor
Translated By: Ngalangka Nola Taylor
Location Recorded: Kunawarritji (Well 33)
Latitude/Longitude: -22.34188/124.77525

Cultural Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on Use
Access: Public
Notes: This story was collected from Martumili Artists on the Punmu trip in 2009. It has been collated from a number of different artists and transcribed by Monique La Fontaine.
Full transcript: Ngamayu Ngamaru Bidu: Hello, I am Ngamaru Bidu. My Country is Pitu [Bidu] and Narkarl, that’s my Country. This man here he came through here in the Dreamtime walking right up through here and then he flew. Other one, a man and a woman, coming behind him, following him right up through here and then finish, I don’t know where they’ve gone. There is one more woman, going across here. This one here is a little waterhole, there is a little creek here and these are all the rockholes, another rockhole here and another rockhole here. This is my home here, and another one coming across here again.

Those three people walked through this Country and disappeared when they flew somewhere. They went forever. That was in the Dreamtime when they were walking around.

END
Source: CSROH_286_Ngamayu_Ngamaru_Bidu
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Ngamayu Ngamaru Bidu; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Jukuja Nora Tjookootja

Jukuja Nora Tjookootja - family story [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Jukuja Nora Tjookootja tells a family story about how somebody killed her sister, and how her father piggy-backed her as a kid.

Date: 2009-11
Art centre(s): Ngurra Artists, Mangkaja Arts Resource Agency
Language spoken: Kriol
Catalogue number: CSROH_252_Jukuja_Nora_Tjookootja
Date: 2009-11
Transcribed By: Monique La Fontaine
Location Recorded: Wangkatjungka
Latitude/Longitude: -18.74/121.88

Cultural Protocols: Public Access
Access: Public
Full transcript: Jukuja Nora Tjookootja: My father been take me Billiluna when I was kid. They been take my brother Mangkayi and he passed away before I was born. After my other brother been show me Piparr. I didn’t know that County I was only kid.

My husband been get me [when I was a] little one, no ngamana [breasts]. He got two sister and we been living at Nyarna. Somebody killed my sister, young one. He carried me on his back when we go walkabout. My husband been leave me in the shade and go hunting and come back with plenty meat. All the meat was hanging in his hairbelt. HE BEEN CARRY ME PIGGY BACK ON THE SHOULDER, look around for water. Mummy been travelling there with me and my husband. My Daddy had three wife out in the bush. In station two wife. My Mummy went Balgo, stayed there.

My sister been lose two son and daughter right there at Nyarna. We been all there. My real Mummy been go Balgo. Another Mummy grew me up, Molly Nyangangiyi. She went droving Wiluna as a cookie [cook]. Her son is Frank Gordon.

END
Source: CSROH_252_Jukuja_Nora_Tjookootja
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Jukuja Nora Tjookootja; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Mayapu Elsie Thomas

Mayapu Elsie Thomas - family story [ORAL HISTORY]Other Speaker/s: Kuji Rosie Goodjie

Synopsis: Mayapu Elsie Thomas tells a family story about her son, husband, and aunty.

Date: 2007-08
Art centre(s): Ngurra Artists, Mangkaja Arts Resource Agency
Catalogue number: CSROH_251_Mayapu_Elsie_Thomas
Date: 2007-08
Translated By: Putuparri Tom Lawford, Monique La Fontaine
Location Recorded: Kulyayi (Well 42)
Latitude/Longitude: -21.31537/125.88258

Cultural Protocols: Public Access
Access: Public
Full transcript: Mayapu Elsie Thomas: That’s why I been cry. Yawi [poor thing].

Kuji Rosie Goodjie: Who for?

ET: For that one who came this way Wiluna [Peter Gogo’s] mother.

RG: This they Country now. This his Country.

ET: On top of that jilji [sandhill] there they been kill them, kakarra [east], on top of that jilji. He been walk around here he been come back and he go on top of that jilji. That my son [Kurtiji Peter Goodijee] from my husband. And my aunty too for Mandy girl. [Molly Dededar – Mapariny Alan Dededar’s mother]. Yeah for my aunty Country too. That’s him.

Where we gotta go camp now? Plenty rabbit in this marsh too.

END
Source: CSROH_251_Mayapu_Elsie_Thomas
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Mayapu Elsie Thomas; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Nana Daisy Kungah

Nana Daisy Kungah - life story [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Nana Daisy Kungah talks about her family and her Country Kaningarra; she paints her Country.

Date: 2009-11
Art centre(s): Paruku Indigenous Protected Area
Catalogue number: CSROH_250_Daisy_Kungah
Date: 2009-11
Location Recorded: Billiluna
Latitude/Longitude: -19.584061/127.630717

Cultural Protocols: Public Access
Access: Public
Full transcript: Walmajarra and Jaru languages
Napanangka skin group
Sturt Creek and Kaningarra jarriny (Dreaming)

Nana Daisy Kungah: Been born at Sturt Creek, I was looking after Country side, Kaningarra, my father’s Country. Mother Country this side. I been grow up Short Creek and my father been come Short Creek and then we came Billiluna when I was a teenager. We been come this way and my father been tellin ‘em but me: ‘My Country Kaningarra’. He been looking after that place. We still looking after that place. That’s way my father passed away. I still look after Kaningarra. Long time married but today we single now, looking after Country and story, old people time. We doing painting for IPA, telling story about old people time, painting story. I got 4 kids, 2 girls and 2 boy and lots of grand-children. They listen to story for Country. Sometimes I always painting Kaningarra for snake and hill everywhere, plenty camel everywhere.

That two Nangala, they been tell me twofella been looking for his louse [?]. I don’t know but that Tjungurrayi been go round and he been tell ‘em: ‘Eh! You can look ‘em this!’ Boomerang, it was throw and ‘nother one been fall and ‘nother one been sitting down – that ‘nother one been slip down, and other one straight. He been throw that boomerang this way from Piparr. But that two my sisters. I been forget name. That two Nangala now. That Dreamtime, they turn into that pamarr [rock/hills].

When we go there la Kaningarra we always cry, Country, me and my sister, cousin sister. They cry now for that place. They change colour that hills, orange, yellow, brown, every afternoon time. But next year we going too to Kaningarra. All the IPA boys, they come to Mulan mob too, they come next year. When you come in this way Godfrey Tank this side – drink water there and we go not far jila now jumu, when they dig ‘em out getembut water, they call ‘em rockhole kartiya and we call ‘em jumu, jila.

I been get that word from my father before he passed away. Teachembut story.

Not like this lot, my family always cry for Country. They got ‘em two rockhole, one down-one for my father and one top-one for ‘nother mob. And sometime when we go there we sing this one: ‘We been come visitor for you’. When we say with that snake, the family been come for Walmajarri.

Rita Mingayi – Sister for Daisy Kungah – got story for Kaningarra again.

END
Source: CSROH_250_Daisy_Kungah
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Nana Daisy Kungah; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Dadda Samson, Judith Samson, Jakayu Biljabu, Yanjimi Peter Rowlands

Dadda Samson, Judith Samson, Jakayu Biljabu, Yanjimi Peter Rowlands - Kumpupirntily (Lake Disappointment) [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Dadda Samson, Judith Samson, Jakayu Biljabu, Yanjimi Peter Rowlands talk about Kumpupirntily.

Date: 2009-04
Art centre(s): Martumili Artists
Language spoken: Kriol
Catalogue number: CSROH_235_Jakayu_Biljabu_Dadda_Samson_Judith_Samson
Date: 2009-04
Transcribed By: Monique La Fontaine
Location Described: Kumpupirntily (Lake Disappointment)
Location Recorded: Punmu
Latitude/Longitude: -22.056806/123.151897
Caution: Contains some course language.

Cultural Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on Use
Access: Public
Notes: These are notes taken from a group discussion at Mangkaja, this is not a transcript of consecutive dialogue rather small notes from different parts of the one group conversation. The text in square brackets contextualises the quotes from the artists.
Full transcript: Painting story: Dadda Samson with Judith Samson (painting catalogue number: 217) – Puntuwarri

P = long shape centre bottom. Yinta (waterhole) surrounding P is yinta, yapu are also surrounding – circles. Hills are circles on the side and Mangkaja. Hills on both side. Circles.

Ngayrnangalku yapu (hills) on other side – light yellow circles. Little baby girl and they ask him are we going to stay one- eat only malu (wallaby) kulku (bandicoot?) etc.

Little wanti (girl) says no we going to eat human too.

Dadda Samson and Jakayu Biljabu: Kumpupirntily (painting story)

Little baby been say Hmm! Mm! (like a hiccup, which meant:) yes keep eating them.

They started sound Mantawinti side and went all the way down and went on their knee and wailed and crawled all the way to Lake Disappointment - Ngayurnangalku travel all the way Savory Creek east and west, stopped at Jilakuru and near Puntuwarri long way and finally stopped at Lake Disappointment.

Dadda Samson (painting catalogue number: 83) Purlpa – Mummy’s country near Mungarlu

Jakayu is related to Mr. Giles through Nyilangkurr country – all belong.

Yanjimi Peter Rowlands, Parnngurr April 2009:

Them Ngayurnangalku they been all mustering one another. Pantalyarra is where Ngayurnangalku started from (Kuntilpa and where Mantawinti is where Savoury creek start Yilkari). They followed that river through Kakarina through Puntuwari. One mob good people coming from direction above. Other mob bad mob come from Natawalu side – one old man round Punmu side eat someone and his mouth all burn. People coming from Puntujarrpa Kiwirrkura side as well. Met up with Warnman people again ‘nother mob.

END
Source: CSROH_235_Jakayu_Biljabu_Dadda_Samson_Judith_Samson
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Dadda Samson, Judith Samson, Jakayu Biljabu, Yanjimi Peter Rowlands; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Nangalaku May Doonday

Nangalaku May Doonday - schooling and work [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Nangalaku May Doonday gives a brief account of schooling, history, and interpreting and documenting stories as part of her current job.

Date: 2009-11
Art centre(s): Paruku Indigenous Protected Area
Catalogue number: CSROH_247_May_Doonday
Date: 2009-11
Location Recorded: Mulan
Latitude/Longitude: -20.102778/127.595278

Cultural Protocols: Public Access
Access: Public
Notes: Transcribed from fieldnotes by Monique La Fontaine. This transcript shifts between narration and direct speech from Evelyn.
Full transcript: May was born in Short Creek Station. She grew up in Billiluna. We moved to Mulan in about 1977. Before that we was growing up in Balgo and schooling there. I went to Balgo boarding school and Broome Nulungku college boarding school. And when I finished school teaching language. Today I still do some language in the IPA. I do interviewing for story and history with old people and translate and interpret stories and put them in the computer. Not only for our people but for all people here. They’re all in the computer and I do traditional stories and put them in the computer - they all there. Children’s story. And we do plants and animals. We all help together for there ladies and they do painting.

END
Source: CSROH_247_May_Doonday
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Nangalaku May Doonday; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Murungkurr Terry Murray

Murungkurr Terry Murray - favourite painting [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Murungkurr Terry Murray talks about a painting by his aunt, Taku Rosie Tarco. He tells about the history that the painting references.

Date: 2008-10-30
Art centre(s): Mangkaja Arts Resource Agency, Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Culture Centre
Language spoken: English
Catalogue number: CSROH_196_Murungkurr_Terry_Murray
Date: 2008-10-30
Location Recorded: National Museum of Australia, Canberra
Latitude/Longitude: -35.291492/149.117931

Cultural Protocols: Public Access
Access: Public
Full transcript: [Terry talks about Rosie Tarco's painting. Holds it up]

Um, this is my aunty, Rosie Tarco. She’s language is Juwaliny, Walmajarri, from the Great Sandy Desert. And she talk about the first time she encountered with Europeans on the Canning Stock Route.

[Phone interrupts]

This is my aunty, Rosie Taco. She’s language group is Jiwarliny, Walmajarri, Great Sandy Desert. And the first time … this story tells about the first time she encountered Europeans, white man, going up the Canning Stock Route, and in those days in the Great Sandy Desert our people were … finding out the first time they were seeing a white man and all these cattle and camel and all these strange animal coming through the desert. And one story that she was telling us, was this promise that she told me that … she told me, my nephew, when I’m out there I’m separate from our family, from your old man and your mother mob, I’m separate, I promised I wouldn’t take me but I was a young little girl, in the early days, and even saying that we didn’t go up North, over East, when we go East, we meet up with all these strange animal and this strange bloke, this white man, and I think during that time the Canning Stock Route, you know, making all that well and first encounter with Europeans and a shock, they were making their way up to Billiluna, and they seen other Aboriginal tribes and people and giving them clothes and different things, food … and she was fascinated, you know, she thought they were all spirit, you know, all these Europeans, coming out of the desert which she didn’t know. Looking at all these strange animals, camel, horse, cattle … and the first time she wore clothes, she was saying, ‘oh yeah, they were putting clothes on us, and even the old man now they go up Mulabula, in mission time, until today now and him tell me that’.

And one part of that story, when I’m in Adelaide at that museum, looking at all this map, me and my brothers, and one of our family members had this map and this old bloke … I forget, my granny again from the Jugunba side, we find this map and we were going through this archive and he encountered again, that first time European. And I think one of the drovers at the time was saying ‘where you from?’ and he was drawing all these circles, lines and looking through this map and Jungunba [?] you know. And we had to go back there, me and my brothers, and find that map, and now we’re in this exhibition now. And he say the first time he be there, mission time, he was saying my family still out there in the desert. And he was doing all this figure and waterhole and jila Country, and you know, till today. And after that most of my family come out and come out from the desert, there’s good stories from family members around everywhere, throughout all that desert area. Yeah.

END
Video format: DVD/MiniDV/Quicktime movie
Video recording: Tape 46
Source: CSROH_196_Murungkurr_Terry_Murray
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Murungkurr Terry Murray; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Hayley Atkins

Hayley Atkins - favourite painting, history of the Canning Stock Route [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Hayley Atkins talks about Patrick Tjungurrayi's paintings and his story for travelling through that country.

Date: 2008-10-30
Art centre(s): Martumili Artists
Language spoken: English
Catalogue number: CSROH_186_Hayley_Atkins
Date: 2008-10-30
Location Recorded: National Museum of Australia, Canberra
Latitude/Longitude: -35.291492/149.117931

Cultural Protocols: Public Access
Access: Public
Full transcript: [Hayley talks about Patrick's painting. Holds it up]

Hayley Atkins: This painting belong to Patrick Olodoodi and … where he from? This Patrick Olodoodi’s painting and he painted all the wells from Well 33 to Well 51, his story about his journey on the Canning Stock Route and the story is of when he was travelling and all the camps … all the people, where they was all camping and he walked past through there, visiting all the families. And, how he seen the place with … the place was alive and the people were alive, before white people made a well, the Canning Stock Route. And how he was telling the story the people was happy and alive and just doing their own thing, like travelling, visiting families, everywhere and they was all connected through the area through Canning Stock Route. And meeting up with different language group and meeting up for ceremony and when the Canning Stock Route, they made through there, how it all separated all the people and a lot of killing and massacre was happening and … the cave he was talking about where he was, but actually he wasn’t there, he went on his journey to Well 50 and around somewhere Well 40 there was a lot of killing, like a lot of people been dying, and he went there and seen a lot of people was dead and seen no life was there, looking at all the people and … so he travelled back ‘cause all the people was dead and he said a story on the trip, we’ve got a video camera of him, how he said it. So that’s his story, how he seen the Canning Stock Route. So he travelled right back to Unduwa [?], just walking a long way.

END
Video format: DVD/MiniDV/Quicktime movie
Video recording: Tape 46
Source: CSROH_186_Hayley_Atkins
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Hayley Atkins; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Kumpaya Girgaba

Kumpaya Girgaba - painting first time [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Kumpaya Girgaba talks about learning to paint for the first time in Kurungal. Before that syhe had exclusively made baskets.

Date: 2009-10-01
Art centre(s): Martumili Artists
Language spoken: Manyjilyjarra
Catalogue number: CSROH_171_Kumpaya_Girgaba
Date: 2009-10-01
Transcribed By: Ngalangka Nola Taylor
Translated By: Ngalangka Nola Taylor
Location Recorded: Parnngurr
Latitude/Longitude: -20.492731/118.537344

Cultural Protocols: Public Access - Verbal Consent
Access: Public
Full transcript: Kumpaya Girgaba: When I was in Kurungal [Wangkatjungka community] I was learning to make basket and other people they was doing painting, that’s how I learned from that side. I learned to make basket first before i started making painting. The painting that they was doing was only for them Walmajarri, Wangkajunga, Fitzroy people. My daughter Kuji and Nada and Wanina, they learned me by watching how they do basket making. I was making basket while all Fitzroy people was painting like this. I just sat and watched the others painting, I never done a painting before, I was first time to see other people doing it. So from there I came back to Jigalong stayed around there and from Jigalong I kept on going Patjarr [Karilwara]. I went and stayed with Katapi and with Giles family and from there I learned how they was doing painting there. I watched their side of doing stories, putting them in paint. And I was given a canvas to paint on for a first time and I start painting and learned from others, for me it was first time to put something on the canvas and to paint stories. From all the Karilwara mob I learned. Before that I just used to do basket making but it still was taught by other families from Fitzroy side, Kurungal. So I came back. and I’ve learned from there and I came back to do painting in my side and even taught the others to paint.

Hayley Atkins: What about Balgo?

KG: No I didn’t learn anything up there, I wasn’t sure about doing painting straight away there. Only in Patjarr my auntie showed me how to paint and watched what sort of stories to put in, I asked her and she told me what stories to put down and which part of the Country I should do, only my area and my stories on my side. So I learned from my auntie, and there I’m painting and also from there I never stop painting and first when I started I did so many, lots and lots of painting ... and so we taught each other and everybody else is doing it now …

John Carty: I thought you learned to paint Balgo side.

KG: No, I was already taught. I just went there and I came back and started to paint back in home where I live.

END
Video recording: 176 NOREENA KADIBIL, KUMPAYA GIRGABA
Source: CSROH_171_Kumpaya_Girgaba
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Kumpaya Girgaba; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - story