Browse by

Browse by art centre

travelling

Natawalu: the Helicopter Story

Story:Many of the people from the Western Desert followed the stock route out of the desert once the drovers began moving through the Country. Following the stock route to find things beyond the desert, many people settled in cattle stations or missions.

However, in 1957 'Helicopter' Tjungurrayi left the desert in a very different way. As a child he was seriously ill when a mining survey party landed their helicopter near his community near Natawalu. His mother’s sister Kupunyina (Kumpaya Girgaba’s mother) was also suffering from an ulcerated spear wound. Knowing about the mission at Balgo their relatives encouraged the survey crew to take them for medical attention.The kartiya [white people] flew him Balgo to get medical attention. When he failed to return his family travelled north in groups to find him.
 
First Walapayi then Brandy walked north to Balgo. Both eventually returned south, following the stock route wells, to bring their relatives back with them to the mission. Helicopter Tjungurrayi has been known by this name for so long, he can no longer remember what he was called before.

'My young brother [Helicopter] was so sick; he had sores everywhere and he was helpless, a little boy. I grabbed my little brother and showed them. So kartiya [white people] looked at his sores and said, "OK, we’ll take him", because he was so sick. So I asked the kartiya, "Are you going to bring him back?" He was speaking his language and I was speaking my language. I kept on saying, "Are you going to bring him back?" I waited, waited, waited for long and I wondered, "They’re not bringing him back!" Nothing. It was getting a bit longer, and I said to myself, I think I’ll go after him north. From there I kept walking right, long way, all the way to Balgo.' (Charlie Wallabi (Walapayi) Tjungurrayi, 2007)

Media Creator:Nicole Ma

Media date: 2010
Story Location: Natawalu (Well 40)
-21.66779/125.78843

Media Description:Josephine Nangala recounts the first time she saw a helicopter, and the story of Helicopter Joey Tjungarrayi being taken by helicopter to Balgo for medicine.

Story contributor(s): John Carty, Helicopter Joey Tjungurrayi, Charlie Wallabi (Walapayi) Tjungurrayi, Josephine Nangala

Art Centre(s): Warlayirti Artists
Publisher: FORM
Media copyright: FORM
Accession ID:20131024_FORM_MIRA_B0046_0004

This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Monica Whisputt

Monica Whisputt - eulogy for Freda Tjarma [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Monica Whisputt’s eulogy for funeral of Freda Tjama in 2004.

Date: 2004
Art centre(s): Paruku Indigenous Protected Area
Catalogue number: CSROH_271_Monica_Whisputt
Date: 2004

Cultural Protocols: Public Access
Access: Public
Notes: Draft biography on Bugai, based on recordings, as well as Nola Taylor’s knowledge
Full transcript: Monica Whisputt: And that Len Brown, given them jobs, cattle jobs, they were mustering around, taking all the camels. They were going to desert. Going to Wiluna droving. My sister had really hard job. And Gracie Daisy sister, she was there too. She was really young girl. Two of them, my sister and Gracie Daisy sister. They really had to go desert, travelling in desert. All the way up to Wiluna. They had cold weather. And coming back down, travelling hot days, coming back down. Really hot, hard work. My sister and Gracie Daisy sister. [I can't callem my sister. Calls Gracie Mosquito over to say the name- Biddy Chungulla/Wallaby]. Yeah, they were wearing trousers and shirt. They were travelling like a cowboy or cowgirl. They were happy days. Really good. Yuwayi, she came and looked after me in Kururrungku. My sister. I'm telling that story, her history from long time. Nyamo.

END
Source: CSROH_271_Monica_Whisputt
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Monica Whisputt; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Nora Wompi

Nora Wompi - biography [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: This transcript is a brief briography of Nora Wompi, based on Monique La Fontaine's handwritten fieldnotes.

Date: 2009-10
Art centre(s): Martumili Artists
Catalogue number: CSROH_276_Nora_Wompi
Date: 2009-10
Location Recorded: Kunawarritji (Well 33)
Latitude/Longitude: -22.34188/124.77525

Cultural Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on Use
Access: Public
Full transcript: Skin group: Nungurrayi
Dreaming: Pussycat
Country: Kunawarritji

Born Pingakurangu Pamarr (rock/hill) rockhole. She travelled around Kunawarritji and when she travelled to Balgo with the drovers she was still a young girl. She lost her Mummy and Daddy. She had four brother – lost, one girl she lost. Wompi’s older brother is Morika’s [Morika Biljabu] Dad. Wompi has two son. Her son Philip Bell is married to Bugai Whylouter.

END
Source: CSROH_276_Nora_Wompi
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Nora Wompi; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

George Tuckerbox

George Tuckerbox - travelling and family [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: George Tuckerbox talks about his family and about travelling. He also talks about getting away from Cyclone Tracy.

Date: 2009-11
Art centre(s): Ngurra Artists, Mangkaja Arts Resource Agency
Language spoken: Kriol
Catalogue number: CSROH_253_George_Tuckerbox
Date: 2009-11
Transcribed By: Monique La Fontaine
Location Recorded: Wangkatjungka
Latitude/Longitude: -18.74/121.88

Cultural Protocols: Public Access
Access: Public
Notes: This is a transcript of fieldnotes from Karen Dayman’s notebook.
Full transcript: George Tuckerbox: I been born desert near Naminy and Makurti and Panjalpunga for all my brothers close up to Kiwirrkurra. I been come from this Country to Paruku before coming to Christmas Creek. My mother been bring me to Tarngku Spring with that kartiya [white man] Sam Thomas and after that we come here now. And they been send me away Derby got man there Yeeda Station. When I was a kid. I worked all around as a teenager then come night back home now Wangkatjungka. Come back and droving from Billiluna to Alice Spring across the Tanamai [Desert].

I married Mayapu [Elsie Thomas] after and lived with her at Tarngku.

My sister Regina finished in Darwin in that Cyclone Tracy 1974, I was living there too I was working buffalo shooting and cyclone came behind but I been get out, big rain.

When he come back he still doing Country painting.

Kurtal is through Daddy side.

END
Source: CSROH_253_George_Tuckerbox
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: George Tuckerbox; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Bugai Whylouter, Ngalangka Nola Taylor

Bugai Whylouter - biography [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: This transcript is a biography of Bugai Whylouter, and is based on recordings as well as Ngalangka Nola Taylor's knowledge.

Date: n.d.
Art centre(s): Martumili Artists
Language spoken: English
Catalogue number: CSROH_272_Bugai_Whylouter
Date: n.d.
Transcribed By: Ngalangka Nola Taylor

Cultural Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on Use
Access: Public
Full transcript: Bugai is in her 60s now.

Father is Warnman, mother is Kartujarra.

Purungu.

Bugai was born in Balfour Downs at Pukayiyirna. Her mother and father took her to Nullagine and Jigalong and from there they went back to the desert. She stayed around Karlamilyi in Warnman country, eastern side Karlamilyi, and along the CSR. She went to Kartaru, Wantili, Tiwa, Mumungarra, Wuranu. When she got bigger she married Nola Taylor’s uncle, they went together around Karlamilyi, and along CSR, met up with Biljabu families, walked around went down again, stayed with Taylor family for a time. That was when they all joined up together [i.e. with the Bidu and Biljabu families] and met Len Beadell. Bugai says she was climbing up the hills because she was frightened. She stayed at Jigalong for a short time and then left because her husband wanted to look for Taylor family. They met up with Taylor family in Karlamilyi, went up again on eastern side of Punmu, went north to Joanna Spring and back south until Nola’s father became sicker. They stayed in Karlamilyi and eventually, the old man passed away and then they all went into Balfour Downs. Bugai had one child at that time. From there they went to Jigalong. Stayed there and then went to Strelley, 61 and then Punmu, then Parnngurr later, then met up with second husband. Bugai lives in Kunawarritji now with her husband, Mr. Bell.

END
Source: CSROH_272_Bugai_Whylouter
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Bugai Whylouter, Ngalangka Nola Taylor; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Partukala Frank Gordon

Partukala Frank Gordon - travelling [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Partukala Frank Gordon tells a story about travelling with Wally Dowling

Date: n.d.
Art centre(s): Paruku Indigenous Protected Area
Catalogue number: CSROH_268_Frank_Gordon
Date: n.d.

Cultural Protocols: Public Access
Access: Public
Full transcript: Partukala Frank Gordon: Yeah we went Kunawarritji. We went all the way long from Kunawarritji, right up to that other one for that other one for [cannibals- ?] travelling. They might kill mefellas. All that people. We was frightened all the way along. And I went over there. And we was frighten for all the poison tree there too. All them poison tree? We move ‘em, cut ‘em out all the bullock, driving him away all the way. I went went went right through to Kunawarritji get water and keep goin’. Right up to Kulyayi, get water keep goin’, get water keep goin’ … with Wally Dowling, he was getting old now. I was young then.

END
Source: CSROH_268_Frank_Gordon
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Partukala Frank Gordon; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Sheila Friday Jones

Sheila Friday Jones - life history [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Sheila Friday Jones gives a brief life history.

Date: 2008-05-11
Art centre(s): Birriliburu Artists, Tjukurba Gallery
Language spoken: English
Catalogue number: CSROH_227_Sheila_Friday_Jones
Date: 2008-05-11
Transcribed By: Monique La Fontaine
Location Recorded: Ullalla Station

Cultural Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on Use
Access: Public
Full transcript: Sheila Friday Jones: I come from the desert but I don’t know whereabouts my 2/3 brothers, I don’t know what place but we went to stay there Carnegie, we went through there, me and the old peoples. They used to steal the mirrka [food] to keep us going from the white people. Georgina Brown’s mother was travelling with us, we’re sisters. My brother Mitutu is older than me, I was big enough to go hunting for mirrka when we saw walypala [white people] first time. We walked into town, we first one to walk into town. We used to stay at the mob of trees near the Shire building when we came in from desert.

We know this family Carl Bingham [Jack Lee’s son], one tracker was following us round and round because old people been stealing mirrka, but we were a little bit tricky for him. We were the first ones to come to town, the Jacksons. The old people stole one watermelon from Glen-Ayle [Station] and that man was still following us. Carl Bingham’s father and Sil Smith he was a policeman.

END
Source: CSROH_227_Sheila_Friday_Jones
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Sheila Friday Jones; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Jukuja Dolly Snell, Ngarralja Tommy May, Manmarr Daisy Andrews

Jukuja Dolly Snell, Ngarralja Tommy May, Manmarr Daisy Andrews - droving [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Jukuja Dolly Snell, Ngarralja Tommy May, and Manmarr Daisy Andrews talk about drover men and women on the Canning Stock Route.

Date: 2009-03
Art centre(s): Mangkaja Arts Resource Agency
Language spoken: Kriol, English
Catalogue number: CSROH_230_Jukuja_Dolly_Snell_Ngarrlija_Tommy_May_Manmarr_Daisy_Andrews
Date: 2009-03
Transcribed By: Monique La Fontaine
Location Recorded: Fitzroy Crossing
Latitude/Longitude: -18.17/125.59

Cultural Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on Use
Access: Public
Notes: This transcript is from fieldnotes written in a notebook by Karen Dayman.
Full transcript: Dolly Snell: Mother been bring me up in Kurtal, take me to Balgo, keep me there. I been grow up and shift from station to Fitzroy [Crossing].

Tommy May: How many people been walkin’ Canning Stock Road? People been travel across from Country side to Canning Stock Road for bullock. Get a meat take him back Country.

Daisy Andrews: Splinters [Flinders?], Jamili [Chum Lee], Pakala [Jack Gordon for uncle] handling the camel with his wife, [Tommy] Bull, Roger [Wangkajunga – Olive Knight mob - this was how Daisy described it but we also learned that Roger was also Chamia Samuels’ father], Pelican – Jamili’s brother. All the Japalyi. Gogo, Jimmy Bieunderry – Wally [Dowling] pick him up kid.

DS: All my sisters been droving. Nyuju [Stumpy Brown], two Wakajiya — mother for Jimmy Bieunderry — ‘nother sister Jinamungkurr [translated here as ‘four foot’ or ‘little bit of toes’ reference to her missing toe]. Minyayi [Dolly’s sister]. Minyayi been leave that little boy, Jungurrayi, behind.

TM: Johnny Boy, Billiluna, Wimpingkil, Roger’s son. Putting old people’s names back in the book. Nyuju husband [first one] walked all the way to Warburton. Big war between tribes – spear fight. He came from southern Canning Stock Route.

END
Source: CSROH_230_Jukuja_Dolly_Snell_Ngarrlija_Tommy_May_Manmarr_Daisy_Andrews
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Jukuja Dolly Snell, Ngarralja Tommy May, Manmarr Daisy Andrews; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Turnga Tossy Baadjo

Turnga Tossy Baadjo - helicopter story [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Turnga Tossy Baadjo tells the story of when her family forst saw a helicopter. She also talks about a massacre in her Country and hiding from trackers.

Date: 2008-05
Art centre(s): Warlayirti Artists
Catalogue number: CSROH_244_Tossie_Baddjo
Date: 2008-05
Transcribed By: Monique La Fontaine
Location Recorded: Balgo
Latitude/Longitude: -20.14/127.985

Cultural Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on Use
Access: Public
Notes: Transcribed from fieldnotes by Monique La Fontaine. This transcript shifts between narration and direct speech from Anna.
Full transcript: Turnga Tossy Baadjo: Hello, my name is Tossy Baadjo and I’m Nangala and the story I’m going to tell is about what happened to my family when kartiya came and picked my families with the helicopter. I was born Irrawili [?] and then my parents would move around and then was came to that place was Natawalu, yeah [laughs]. Yeah, mmm. And my families saw helicopter was coming too, coming and they saw, because my family didn’t know what helicopter was they were calling devil, kukurr, kukurr means devil, that helicopter, big monster. [Correction 2009: We thought the helicopter was pilpinji – grasshopper] And they all ran and hide in the trees and spinifex and then Brandy and my brother Tjapanangka was there in the photo, and uncle, Uncle Wimmitji and Uncle Miki, they was there and when that helicopter land at that swamp they all ran and got their spear and start throwing and throwing it to, they thought it was a monster. And my mother had to dig a hole and put me in the, underneath the spinifex, because he was too scared to see a helicopter landed. They thought it, that helicopter gonna bite me and Melda, we was the smallest. [Tossy’s mother was taken by an eagle as a baby. She still has the claw marks on her shoulders]

So they went and meet the pilot. They dropped their spear. There were three drums. I don’t know who put three drums there for us survive for water. And this man who was driving the helicopter saw my families was skinny, not putting weight and he had to take, and Helicopter was bit sick too. That’s what my mother told me. He was sick and his mother. So Helicopter was crying, he wanted his mother to follow him. And we didn’t have anything to eat or we didn’t have anything to eat, so the helicopter pilot had to give us something to eat. And he was really sad and sorry to see all these young men were skinny and their ribs were showing and I was really, we was skinny too little ones, and bit sick us. Had to, and Helicopter went away now, he was bit sick. And we had to walk to Balgo. We walked from what that place now [Tim: Natawalu!] Natawalu, I don’t know ... yeah that place where Helicopter was picked up, we had to walk from that place to Jalyirr, had to go round and round looking for the track for our young, me and our young family was taken away by the police [Correction 2009: St John of God sister and priest], so we had to follow their track.

We saw those, our uncles and fathers, brothers getting sick all the way road. We had to follow the road now, Jalyirr right up to that turn off, through Billiliuna and Mulan road and we went through C25 [?], we had to stay there for a while, Melda make up a noise. We had to sleep there with no blanket, no fire, only a bit of shade in our tree, in, under the shade. Then we got up and e went to Kitji [?], where two trees are and my cousin had a baby boy, that was on Christmas day, Richard, we stay there … we saw a few stock man from Mulan. They gave us a killer and told us, ‘Don’t make a fire because we got a strict manager here’. So we was, I was that hungry, so I was I had to eat little bit of raw ... then we went to Parnkupiti, over the cut line going to Handover. We stay there and then we saw a light, a big bright light, pointing down to Balgo. And we had to walk now to the old sta ... um, to Kumantjayi [?] Creek and we saw a few like Helicop ... not, ah sorry Charlie Wallabi and Brandy, went hunting and they saw us and we, they went back to old mission and then after we went through where the hill is we saw Bye Bye and Sunfly and they told us, ‘Come on, we’ll take you over there to mission.’

And my mother was pretty sick too because when she was a young girl in the bush caught by an eagle [gestures to the top of her shoulders] yeah, she got all those marks here, here [shoulder/shoulder] and on his back and eyes from those claws, sharp one. So she was pretty sick she couldn’t handle me, she wasn’t looking after me properly. My sister was looking after me, Josephine. Took me to the dormitory now and Sister had to take me away. From there I never seen my families again. Me and Melda. That was a long walk we had from the bush, starving and Helicopter, when I saw Helicopter, I didn’t know his name I had to, I was listening to every kid: ‘Helicopter! Helicopter!’ and I was looking, ‘Who Helicopter? This one?’ and then I remember him, that he was taken away on the helicopter.

[Whispers fiercely] Nyamu?

Tim Acker: I got some question.

TB: Yeah.

TA: When you were at Natawalu were you a little little girl?

TB: Little one, just crawling.

TA: And that’s the first time you been see kartiya then?

TB: That’s the first time I see kartiya.

TA: What did you think?

TB: I thought it was a ghost! Yeah.

TA: Did you touch those kartiya then or did you hide all the time.

TB: No, hide all the time.

TA: And where you been born?

TB: Irrawili.

TA: And where’s that Country?

TB: That’s near, not far from that place where Helicopter been picked up.

TA: You been back?

TB: No, I want to go back and see my Country but nothing. Never.

TA: What about that first time you seen bullock?

TB: Bullocky? Oh we thought it was kukurr, we didn’t know that bullocky, we kept on running away. My uncle was spearing, we thought it was a monster but nothing. [Helicopter talking in language background. Tossy whispering] What’s another question?

TA: When you travelled, walked up from Natawalu was there a track?

TB: There was a track [Helicopter: No, no track I been go up ‘copter] no, bullocky track, no, we saw a track, camel track and then after we saw our man who was caught by a tracker at the police that’s why we had to follow the track.

TA: That’s what you followed?

TB: All the way here.

TA: How many when you were walking up? How many people were you travelling with?

TB: I travelled with my families and my uncle families Wimmitji and my brother, with Loomoo’s husband and my cousin and Melda’s father, and his father name is Government, there.

TA: Wow. After this we’ll write out that family, put him on the paper ‘cause that would be really good to see how this family fit. So that was big mob people who walked?

TB: Yeah. We was the last people who came. [Chopper talking genealogy in background, Tim tells him we’ll do it after on the paper] We was the last people to came out from the bush.

TA: Why did you walk out, why did you leave that bush?

TB: No, because Government, Melda’s father went to Jalyuwan, Jalyuwan and so Father Kumantjayi, Father Alphonse, yeah and he told, he was like, ‘Bring all your families’, because there were lot of people was there from the bush and they had lotta food and they was a church.

TA: Where was that?

TB: Jalyuwan.

TA: So Wimmitji didn’t come up to Jalyuwan?

TB: No, Melda’s father Government, he went by himself to meet the others, like the Apostles, you know where they went? Like that. And Father Alphonse and Father McGuire said, ‘Go back and bring your families’. That’s why he went back to bush, got us into group and then we came walking.

TA: Big mob walking one time.

TB: Mmm. It was a really hot day and we had no water so my uncle saw a bird, a tree, and it had birds and he knew it had water underneath, so my auntie and my cousin and my sister, she was the youngest, I was only a, just starting up to be four years old, I had to dig and they found it so we had to drink and start walking and it was a really hot day. No, you know thing to eat, we couldn’t catch anything.

TA: So what did you think? ‘Sause walking up this way is a long way from your Country.

TB: Yeah I was worried it was too far. I was going to die because I was the youngest. I was the youngest [laughs] sorry. No, I was youngest and my sister was telling me how did you live? How did you survive right to Balgo? It was really hot, no shade to sleep. They had to dig a hole, sand, and put me and Melda in the cool, you know, underneath? Covered up with our cool. And my cousin brother who passed away his name Billy Wimmitji, that’s his name and Kevin Loomoo, we was the four youngest one who came. I was the smallest. My cousin brother Billy and Melda and Kevin Loomoo, yeah.

TA: And you said after you came and your Mum was sick. Did your Mum and Dad go other way or ... ?

TB: No.

TA: How come you never saw your parents again?

TB: I didn’t see my families because those sisters wouldn’t let us go out only, they don’t let us go, they keep us there, only, only, school holidays we go see our parents.

TA: Did your parents live Jalyuwan or did they go walking?

TB: No, only my father was travelling and walking, see he’s looking at, looking after his Country Nyila, only my mother was staying at Jalyuwan looking after the sheep. And he comes back, my father comes back from that place, that’s the time I see my father when he, when I meet him half way road where that Jalyuwan Creek is, that road goes to round the Lake.

TA: And when you been growing up did you see those other drovers travelling the stock route from Billiluna down?

TB: I didn’t see them I was in the dormitory all the time. The only thing I seen was my father when he passed away that’s all.

TA: Did he pass away here?

TB: Yeah, where that brown building near Palitja Maparn office, that’s where was the morgue was.

TA: Anything else for story you wanna tell?

TB: I was gonna tell you that other story that my mother, not my, yeah my mother told me about police and a tracker. They were coming to that place, I forgot that place it’s really hard to say that name. My families went hunting and me and Melda we were dig, we was put in the hole, covered up, put a spinifex on top of us and then, because they saw a tracker, and police coming with a horse, horses galloping, and people was sitting around meeting place, they was talking, they didn’t hear the horses galloping, and one of them, one of the young fella, do I have to call my brother name? [Tim: yeah you can] yeah I can call him easy. [Tim: yuwayi] Johnny, Johnny Lakapanja saw the horses coming, kukurr! kukurr! But we didn’t know what was horse was you know, it’s a mamu! mamu! And they all got up it was too late, the elders got up with a spear trying to spear the horse, the police, but they shoot him, they shoot everyone. This is a really story and it’s a true story and I never forget this story. They shot at our boss, the leader and their boss, everyone: ladies, young girls, pregnant girls, horses putting weight on the little ones and they took all the young men and they put a chain on their neck and they carried a ball in their hand and they had to walk. But lucky me and Melda, lucky our parents put us in a hole and put sand, so we can’t scream, you know they might hear us and they might shoot us, but they put us in the hole, covered up with the sand and they put a spinifex. We could easy see the policemen shooting and trackers and our parents came back from hunting and they was crying and my uncle too, but my uncle’s brother was with a chain, didn’t see him. Wimmitji was there with a thing, with a chain and a ball. What is, all round we could hear them crying, some and my mother and my cousin sister had to dig us, pull us out. We went down to see that place it was all blood everywhere. After that they got there, put them in a hole and put a kerosene on them and it was really sad. I was always think about that place. But it’s a really sacred place now. But when I go to Wangkatjungka for these funerals I’ll ask my mother where that place is, where they got shot for no reason. That’s why I told my children the story and when I tell the story to my children they have tears come out, they think about, must be their great great grandfathers and they great uncles, aunties. I lost my families there. I didn’t see my mother, my mother’s mother, my father’s mother, never. They was there. I keep going, telling stories to my children, even my stories when I came from the bush. That’s all the stories. Mmm.

[KD’s notebook from conversations with Eubena & Nyumi at Balgo: Biddee Baadjo, Tossy & Melda last lot to come in to Balgo.]

END
Source: CSROH_244_Tossie_Baddjo
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Turnga Tossy Baadjo; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Lena Long

 

Lena Long - life history [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: This is a brief life history of Lena Long, including information about her work with native title, her marriage, and family.

Date: 2009-11
Art centre(s): Birriliburu Artists, Tjukurba Gallery
Language spoken: English
Catalogue number: CSROH_226_Lena_Long
Date: 2009-11
Transcribed By: Monique La Fontaine
Location Recorded: Wiluna
Latitude/Longitude: -26.59/120.22

Cultural Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on Use
Access: Public
Notes: This transcription is from fieldnotes written by Monique La Fontaine.
Full transcript: Born 3/3/50 Karimarra skin group Kartujarra, Putijarra languages (on family side) Jarriny - bangarra (goanna) dreaming Lena was born at Well 7, while her mum [Manga Margaret Long] was shepherding cattle. They went to Granite Peak and some people went in motorcar but Manga wanted to ride on horseback. She seen fire burning at Well 8 or 9 – big smoke. ‘Talik and Gogo saw the fire and told everybody – must be Martu!’ They jumped in Landrover and went and picked them up – one old man, three wives and their children. Mr P [Billy Patch] seen Lena little baby one and came straight over to play with her and then stayed with Manga from then on. He was about four years old. They stayed at Granite Peak where Mum was working. Lena went primary school in Wiluna and then went Karalundi school with Sheila [Sheila Friday Jones]. After school worked in Wiluna mission and picked oranges at Desert Farm, then after got sick of Wiluna area and went Sandstone and got a job in National Hotel looking after kids and cleaning up and part time worked for policeman and looking after his daughter. After that met my first husband there in hotel, walypala [whitefella]. Got engaged there in hotel and had a party – went to Perth and got married. Caroline [Lena’s sister] was little girl and she carried the finger ring. Then we came back and he worked crushing gold ore in Sandstone. Lena adopted one son. After that we went to work on Mulga Down working for Lang Hancock fencing. He was a good old bloke and his daughter Georgina [?]. After that we came back Sandstone and stayed there. I went on a trip east twice with Mr Jones [first husband] to Sydney and Snowy Mountain and Murray. Went to Broken Hill. Then pastor from mission passed away and someone rang from Wiluna and we came home. We were really upset. Then after that I got a divorce and met Miranda’s dad. They lived in Meekatharra, Leonora, Newman, working CDEP, then back to Wiluna. Lena works with native title and travels out to her Country on projects. Lena started painting in mission and Mulga Downs selling to tourists around Hammersley – gave it away for a while then saw this Tjukurba Gallery start up again. And still working with native title as a liaision officer for Birriliburu. Ullalla Boss [Geoffrey Stewart] was on the plane when they went over Lake Disappointment – that plane started rocking. Manga, Tilly‘s mum [Lady Stevens] and Auntie Sally when they get bored they chase the marlu [kangaroo] on a horse out in the flat and then they kill it with warta – stick. Granite Peak – yiriyiti [?] – flat Country. They used to have a race, including, in the flat, jump over bushes. They used to make Tilly’s mum climb up the tree to get the eggs from the butcher bird. Butcher bird cheeky when they got babies. They only do it for fun. Lena calls Yungkurra Billy Atkins daddy and Miriam and Violet Atkins aunty. [from Karen Dayman’s notebook early 2007] Lena Long: I grew up on Granite Peak Station when Tom Cartright was manager. He had twin sons I used to play with. We were nearly the same age. We used to go and play with them all day. I used to get along well with the Cartrights. Mum used to be house girl but when it was mustering time she used to go out to mustering camps. She used to muster the cattle on horseback. END
Source: CSROH_226_Lena_Long
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Lena Long; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - travelling