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Nyarna, Lake Stretch, 2007

Location: Nyarna Lake Stretch

Date: 8/16/2007

Event Description: In July and August 2007, around 60 artists from seven art centres travelled along the stock route documenting their stories and painting their Country in workshops held along the route. The last of these was at Nyarna, Lake Stretch, near Billiluna. Many new artworks were produced at Nyarna and the first Canning Stock Route 'exhibition' was held here on the shores of the Lake. A number of dances were also performed as part of the final celebrations at the culmination of this trip.



People: Putuparri Tom Lawford, Monique La Fontaine, Karen Dayman

Art Centre(s): CSR Project

Media Description: Artworks displayed at the Nyarna, Lake Stretch Artists Camp. Canning Stock Route bush trip 16- 18 August 2007.

Rights: Photo by Tim Acker

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Culture Centre, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Ngamayu Ngamaru Bidu

Ngamayu Ngamaru Bidu - 'Two Birds' painting story [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Ngamayu Ngamaru Bidu tells a Dreamtime story of a man and a woman who changed into birds and flew away when they found a rockhole was dry.

Date: 2008-04
Art centre(s): Martumili Artists
Language spoken: Martu Wangka
Catalogue number: CSROH_284_Ngamayu_Ngamaru_Bidu
Date: 2008-04
Transcribed By: Ngalangka Nola Taylor
Translated By: Ngalangka Nola Taylor
Location Recorded: Kunawarritji (Well 33)
Latitude/Longitude: -22.34188/124.77525

Cultural Protocols: Public Access - Verbal Consent
Access: Public
Full transcript: [‘Two Birds’ painting story]

[Brown, many footprints, centred on a tiny brown waterhole]

Ngamayu Ngamaru Bidu: The footprints tell the story of a man and a woman, walking back and forth across the same Country, searching for water. The tiny brown rockhole in the centre is Jarturti, and it is small and brown because it contains no water. The man and the woman searched and searched for water but found nothing. Finally, they changed into two birds and flew away.

[Audio File: T351: this recording may relate to the above painting]

This is a well called Martilirri. And around there is also Kalypa and Kartarru, in the middle. And in summertime we could stop in those places because they have permanent water. After the rain we could move back to our homeland because the rockholes and soaks would all be filled again. And we walked around there, and we got the third sister, Ivy. Ivy [Karlkapa] was born in Martilirri. They used to walk around that area, going northwest side of CSR and back out to the east, up and down, back to our homeland, back to our own yinta. And the other two got big enough to hunt small animals [small lizards]. This is Jarturti, country for the Williams family. My uncle’s Country is around Markurti. Kurlku. Can’t remember the name of that soak. Marlukujarra rockhole. And the footprints are a Dreamtime of a man looking for a water, wanti and a man travelling together and flying. When they checked it there was no water around that rockhole, and when there was no water they flew.

END
Source: CSROH_284_Ngamayu_Ngamaru_Bidu
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Ngamayu Ngamaru Bidu; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Putuparri Tom Lawford

Putuparri Tom Lawford - songlines, technology [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Putuparri Tom Lawford describes songlines and boundaries, and talks about how much learning there is in becoming a law man. He also talks about technology, and how sometimes it is needed, but that it can also distract from learning about Country.

Date: 2012-06
Art centre(s): CSR Project, Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Culture Centre
Language spoken: English
Catalogue number: CSROH_279_Putuparri_Tom_Lawford
Date: 2012-06
Transcribed By: Mollie Hewitt
Location Recorded: Newman Creek

Cultural Protocols: Public Access
Access: Public
Notes: This was filmed on the repatriation trip to Newman in 2012. It was transcribed for subtitles, and it is therefore incomplete (and missing interviewer questions) and includes time codes from the film footage.
Full transcript: [Time Code: 22.49]

[Tom Lawford drawing in the sand]

Tom Lawford: Big Country, Australia. Canning Stock Route is just one bit, one little bit there. We will only focus on this bit.

These are the lines right, songlines that travel up and down the Countryside. And across, they go across. And every little circle, this is different tribes, this is their Country. And this mob can’t intrude into their Country, they can’t trespass. They got their own stories. Every little square. This is their own area and you can’t trespass.

[Pointing to his map drawn in the sand] You got up north here, Halls Creek, Billiluna, Halls Creek. And Wiluna down south. And you got the Stock Road. The Canning Stock Road cuts through all these different places. And there is Wells, some say waterholes, in people’s Country.

There are wells on the Canning Stock Route but they are people’s water. Where the Canning Stock Route cut through it took over our water and they made wells. And in a way Alfred Canning, he trespassed onto people’s land, Country.

He took over their waters for animals, to feed cattle. So these lines here, they are all songlines. That is how people are connected, they follow these songline – down, up and across.

[Tom is asked to explain songlines.]

Songlines are ... there’s Dreaming songs for the public and for women and children to hear and there are secret, sacred songlines only for men only. And these songlines they follow a being – like a person. Say this being travelled across this Country and they followed a songline through and the songline even travel across the border – to the territory [Northern Territory]. And then people follow it and then these guys from across the border [of the Northern Territory] they take it on.

Yeah and these songlines have different languages. One songline, one language sing it and then it change for another mob, another language sing it. But it is the same [story].

Well the Canning Stock Route, it broke the Country up. Most of these songlines up north, across here and some down here.

People were living in harmony, in peace. They had their own areas. One mob got their little square there. And the Canning Stock Route it cuts through different people’s land.

[Time code: 27.25]

[Tom is asked about how you know where the boundaries are for different people’s Country.]

Landmarks. Like that hill over there. So if you go over that hill over there it could be another tribe’s Country. You can only go as far as this creek but don’t go beyond that creek.

Well it’s in us because we are Wangkajunga tribe and our area is here [pointing at the sand map] and it’s Martu tribe here and you got another tribe here. And your tribe, you know how far your boundaries are.

It is right across Australia. There is too many tribes, right down to Tasmania.

Well some other tribes, some storyline or songline they cut through that tribe and through other tribes too. You know this songline comes from that area, through this area, cuts through and finishes in this mob area here.

That song itself will tell you. When they are singing a song, it’s a story, it will tell you how far it comes from this tribe to another tribe. And that is the good thing about all Western Desert people, it that we got the one songline that follows on. Even though we come from different parts of the Great Sandy Desert.

We still do that, practice that during our law time. Like the ladies got their own, you can’t interfere with women, men can’t.

That is why you gotta keep it [all that knowledge] in your head. You gotta know, because without that, what would you be? You would just be like a leaf blowing in the wind. You’d be nothing. That is why it is really important to learn from the old people, keep learning. Because, in our culture you don’t count yourself as a man, as a law man, until you know everything. Not half.

[Tom is asked how you become a law man.]

You can’t claim it for yourself, saying, ‘I’m a law man.’ You gotta go through everything to say it. Then the old people gotta go, ‘you’re right, you’ve finished your thing’. Not on your own, they gotta say it. You gotta finish your culture to be how they are. You can be fifty or forty to be a law man, could be eighty. Not twenty or thirty. Not until they say you are one.

[Time code: 32.20]

Some sacred stuff when you keep coming you get taught the real stuff. It gets harder and harder.
Even coming here, to a place like this you are learning. THE COUNTRY IS TEACHING YOU. EVEN THE TREES CAN TEACH YOU.

You gotta cut away technology from your head. Leave the mobile phone and computer aside. And then you have gotta think about your home, for your culture. If you keep that in your mind, and think about what you want to be and how you want to be, without these other interruptions, you can make it in life.

Mobile phone won’t get you anywhere, technology won’t get you anywhere. But we have to use technology, everything is changing, the Country is changing. If you go back to Country, back out to the bush we need a GPS now to find our way back. Most of the old people are all gone now to show us the way through the Country. We need the technology now and then, but not all the time.

To live in this world now you need have both, you have to learn white man way and your own way to live in this world. Otherwise you will never survive.

Yeah I feel it [responsibility]. But looking at things now, how things are changing, you can feel it. And what’s happening to our mob you know, with alcohol and drugs, with rubbish things that are killing them slowly. And it is a big responsibility. Especially when you got kids like these mob here, you gotta be there for them, not for you. You gotta be there for the next mob coming up.

END
Video recording: 03_DAY_THREE
Source: CSROH_279_Putuparri_Tom_Lawford
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Putuparri Tom Lawford; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Kurpaliny Bessie Doonday

Kurpaliny Bessie Doonday - Barrumundi Dreaming [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Kurpaliny Bessie Doonday gives a brief description of Barrumundi Dreaming, the Kiki story, and Kiji Country.

Date: 2009-03
Art centre(s): Paruku Indigenous Protected Area
Language spoken: English, Walmajarri
Catalogue number: CSROH_161A_Kurpaliny_Bessie_Doonday
Date: 2009-03
Location Recorded: Mulan
Latitude/Longitude: -20.102778/127.595278

Cultural Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on Use
Access: Public
Notes: Bessie and her daughter May Stundi (Doonday) explained that this story contains Traditional Knowledge that Raymond Chungulla has the rights to speak for. It is unclear in this transcript what is paraphrased and what is direct quotation.
Full transcript: Barramundi dreaming is Kumirrki’s dreaming. Pirnang pirnang – all the sisters’ Dreaming for barramundi. Kumirrki is mother for Tiger – is also Granny for Bessie and Megan and Lulu, Leonard and Pyes. Kumirrki died at Sturt Creek and Evelyn Clancy’s husband found her there. Ned Cox – Kiki story, Kiki was Ned’s grandfather. The story of the two dingos chasing the emu at Paruku comes from Mangkayi. The white dingo travelled from there. Two dogs been meet ‘emself at Wirriyarra [Well 51].

All the men’s stories were Bessie’s fathers. He passed them on to Bessie’s husband Bill Doonday. Kiji [bone] Country. Snake been eating all the people near Tarngku because they didn’t give the willy wagtail any presents at law time. Evelyn’s husband’s mother used to hide him from drovers – they might take him. Kurliny [wild] Jack family – those cheeky two murderers – Penny K-Lyons husband.

END
Video format: on miniDVD/DVD
Video recording: 151 MONA CHUGUNA, NORA TJOOKOOTJA, BESSIE, MAY AND BILL DOONDAY
Source: CSROH_161A_Kurpaliny_Bessie_Doonday
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: ; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Niesha and Lizzie at Nabberu

Niesha and Lizzie at Lake Nabberu. Canning Stock Route bush trip, July 2007.

Date created: 2007-07-19
Photographer: Tim Acker
Location: Lake Nabberu
Latitude/Longitude: -25.59927/120.48897

People: Roberta (Lizzie) Minor, Niesha Long
Art Centre(s): Birriliburu Artists, Tjukurba Gallery

Copyright: FORM
Format: Image
Category: Image
Source: Canning Stock Route bush trip 16-21 July 2007
Accession ID: 20131220_FORM_MIRA_B0001_0099

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Long shadows at Lake Nabberu

Long shadows and filming setup at Lake Nabberu. Canning Stock Route bush trip, July 2007.

Date created: 2007-07-19
Photographer: Tim Acker
Location: Lake Nabberu
Latitude/Longitude: -25.59927/120.48897

People: Cam McGrath, Paul Elliott
Art Centre(s): Birriliburu Artists, Tjukurba Gallery

Copyright: FORM
Format: Image
Category: Image
Source: Canning Stock Route bush trip 16-21 July 2007
Accession ID: 20131220_FORM_MIRA_B0001_0098

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Looking at Lake Nabberu

Nicole and Mervyn looking toward Lake Nabberu. Canning Stock Route bush trip, July 2007.

Date created: 2007-07-19
Photographer: Tim Acker
Location: Lake Nabberu
Latitude/Longitude: -25.59927/120.48897

People: Nicole Ma, Jawurji Mervyn Street
Art Centre(s): Birriliburu Artists, Tjukurba Gallery

Copyright: FORM
Format: Image
Category: Image
Source: Canning Stock Route bush trip 16-21 July 2007
Accession ID: 20131220_FORM_MIRA_B0001_0097

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Parked at Lake Nabberu

Parked at Lake Nabberu. Canning Stock Route bush trip, July 2007.

Date created: 2007-07-19
Photographer: Tim Acker
Location: Lake Nabberu
Latitude/Longitude: -25.59927/120.48897

People: Jason Collard, Carly Davenport, John Carty, Danny Glasby,
Art Centre(s): Birriliburu Artists, Tjukurba Gallery

Copyright: FORM
Format: Image
Category: Image
Source: Canning Stock Route bush trip 16-21 July 2007
Accession ID: 20131220_FORM_MIRA_B0001_0096

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Carly and Jason, Lake Nabberu

Carly and Jason at the lake's edge. Canning Stock Route bush trip, July 2007.

Date created: 2007-07-19
Photographer: Tim Acker
Location: Lake Nabberu
Latitude/Longitude: -25.59927/120.48897

People: Carly Davenport, Jason Collard
Art Centre(s): CSR Project

Copyright: FORM
Format: Image
Category: Image
Source: Canning Stock Route bush trip 16-21 July 2007
Accession ID: 20131220_FORM_MIRA_B0001_0093

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Pool of water at Walga Rock

A natural pool at Walga Rock. Canning Stock Route bush trip, July 2007.

Date created: 2007-07-17
Photographer: Tim Acker
Location: Walga Rock
Latitude/Longitude: -27.42/117.88

People: Cam McGrath
Art Centre(s): CSR Project

Copyright: FORM
Format: Image
Category: Image
Source: Canning Stock Route bush trip 16-21 July 2007
Accession ID: 20131220_FORM_MIRA_B0001_0024

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

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