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Well 42

Nyarna, Lake Stretch, 2007

Location: Nyarna Lake Stretch

Date: 8/16/2007

Event Description: In July and August 2007, around 60 artists from seven art centres travelled along the stock route documenting their stories and painting their Country in workshops held along the route. The last of these was at Nyarna, Lake Stretch, near Billiluna. Many new artworks were produced at Nyarna and the first Canning Stock Route 'exhibition' was held here on the shores of the Lake. A number of dances were also performed as part of the final celebrations at the culmination of this trip.



People: Putuparri Tom Lawford, Monique La Fontaine, Karen Dayman

Art Centre(s): CSR Project

Media Description: Artworks displayed at the Nyarna, Lake Stretch Artists Camp. Canning Stock Route bush trip 16- 18 August 2007.

Rights: Photo by Tim Acker

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Culture Centre, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Jukuna Mona Chuguna

Jukuna Mona Chugna - Kulyayi story [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Jukuna Mona Chugna tells the story of when kartiya chopped of the kalpurtu's head at Kulyayi (Well 42).

Date: 2008-11-01
Art centre(s): Mangkaja Arts Resource Agency
Language spoken: Juwaliny
Catalogue number: CSROH_159_Jukuna_Mona_Chuguna
Date: 2008-11-01
Translated By: Putuparri Tom Lawford
Location Described: Kulyayi (Well 42)
Location Recorded: Broome
Latitude/Longitude: -17.9619/122.2361

Cultural Protocols: Public Access - Verbal Consent
Access: Public
Notes: This is only a partial transcription from film footage, it was transcribed for the exhibition and it was used in the pull out story for Kulyayi.
Full transcript: Jukuna Mona Chuguna: And my jaja [maternal grandmother] they been tell ‘em ‘bout me story. Ngana jangka [what’s wrong]? No what this one nganayi ngana ngapa minya [what’s this water]? Kulyayi (Well 42). Yeah that Canning Stock Route when they was taking bullock, that’s another story that one.

Righto she was a young girl, there was big mob of people, they were collecting this bush tucker called yulypu. They was cutting it and standing it up. Righto they were coming back now from walkabout [ruwa jangka] then they saw kartiya [white people]. Oh this one true story. ‘Hey! He kartiya here!’ ‘Ah, no he’s alright.’ That kartiya been kill that snake. He laid him down that face for snake [chopped its head off]. Righto, that snake now, or kalpurtu [dreamtime snake], sorry, that kalpurtu, he gave them to eat. ‘No, we can’t eat it,’ they said. ‘Eat it! That’s meat,’ kartiya say. ‘Oh, it’s no good. It’s not your mob meat.’ ‘You mob eat this then, flour, and tobacco.’ Yeah, mm. Oh yeah, that’s were she was saying. She was a young girl then my jaja [maternal grandmother].

END
Video format: on miniDVD/DVD
Video recording: 151 MONA CHUGUNA, NORA TJOOKOOTJA, BESSIE, MAY AND BILL DOONDAY
Source: CSROH_159_Jukuna_Mona_Chuguna
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Jukuna Mona Chugna; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Jila Men

Story:The nothern end of the Canning Stock Route crosses the Great Sandy Desert. Here springs are considered 'living waters' and are known as jila. Some are inhabited by ancestral beings and many of these jila are linked by Dreaming tracks that connect Countries and people. The ancestral stories of these sites are recorded in the songs and dances that cross the desert, uniting peoples through shared ceremonies and law. A number of these jila became wells on the Canning Stock Route. Of around 200 permanent springs or jila in this country, only about 30 are inhabited by powerful ancestral beings: snakes, which are also known as jila, or kalpurtu. Two of these jila, Kulyayi (Well 42) and Kaningarra (Well 48), became stock route wells. Before they became snakes, these jila were men who made rain, shaped the features of the land and introduced practices of law to the jila country. Many of the jila men were also companions who travelled the desert visiting one another, creating the ceremonies and singing the songs that the people of the jila country still perform today. One by one, the jila men ended their journeys at the waters that bear their names, and as they entered their jila, they transformed into the rainbow serpents, kalpurtu. These sites are of great importance to Aboriginal people and they can be as dangerous as they are vital. As places where rain is made, jila must first be ceremonially cleaned out by men. Crescent shaped banks are fashioned around the edge of the jila to signify kutukutu [rain-bearing clouds] before women are invited to approach. The dreaming stories of the jila men Kulyayi and Kaningarra are also connected to those of Kurtal and Wirnpa, two other important jila in this Country.

Media Creator:Nicole Ma

Media date: 2010

Media Description:Four dances are performed at the Ngumpan workshop, which took place at Ngumpan Community east of Fitzroy Crossing in late 2008.

Story contributor(s):Monique La Fontaine, Ngilpirr Spider Snell

Art Centre(s): Other
Publisher: FORM
Media copyright: FORM
Accession ID:DATE_FORM_MIRA_B0098_0001

This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Kulyayi

Non-Indigenous name: Well 42
Historical name: Guli tank

Traditional knowledge: While searching for his young brother Rover Thomas, Clifford Brooks’ father Charlie came across a massacre site somewhere between wells 40 and 42. This was most likely the place where Kurtiji Peter Goodijie witnessed the massacre of his parents and siblings as a child near Well 42.

My father die there, two mothers, my brother, all the kids. Kartiya [white people] kill whole lot. Daddy kill camel, kartiya [come] after him. Father been kill ‘em camel, tommy hawk. "Christ, we better go, kartiya might shoot us! Come on, get up, lets go!" We went to them old fellas, they told us, “You two go.” We went away to a sandhill, sat down there looking at them from a long way.

Then we saw all the kartiya come up. "What? You been living here, old man?" "Don’t shoot me! I gotta sing you!" One old man got up with his spear and speared one of their horse on the leg. Kartiya shot him right there. That other old [kartiya] fella shoot him too. These mob, three sister and two mother for me, poor fella, all lot finished. That old man been die there. This my Country. That kartiya shoot him, shoot him sideways. (Kurtiji Peter Goodijee, 1986)

Native title area: Ngurarra determination
Well data: 1906 quality: First class

Current quality of well: Soakage

Current quality of water: Green, no smell

Total dissolved salts (ppm): 2585

PH level: 8.3

PH level date: 2007
-21.31537/125.88258
Related art centre(s): Other

Media title: Kulyayi
Media creator: Clifford Brooks
Date: 2007

Media description: Ruins of Well 42 at Kulyayi
Media Copyright: Clifford Brooks
Format: Image
Accession ID: FORM_MIRA_B0088_0030

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Warla

Artist(s): Karntakarnta Billy Thomas

Date created: 2008
Art Centre(s): Red Rock Gallery
Size: 119.5x89.5
Medium: ochre on canvas

Artwork Story: Warla are the salt lakes — like Lake Disappointment and the Percival Lakes. The warla in this painting is situated somewhere between wells 40 and 42, the same area where Clifford Brooks‘s father encountered a massacre site while in search of his brother Rover. The artist describes the warla in this painting as ‘flat like an airport’. Salt lakes were in fact used to land military supply planes during the reconditioning of the stock route in the 1940s. While still a teenager working as a stockman on the Canning Stock Route, the artist encountered Rover himself, filling water buckets with the drovers at Kukupanyu (Well 39).

Location depicted: Warla between Well 40 and 42

Artwork copyright: ©2013 Karntakarnta Billy Thomas
Catalogue ID: BT/219/RR
Protocols: Public Access - Restrictions on use

Photographer: Jason McCarthy
Photograph date: 2009-05-22
Photography copyright: National Museum of Australia
Format: Image
Category: Artwork

Artist(s) biography:
born about 1920, deceased
Wangkajunga language group
Jungurrayi skin group
Fitzroy Crossing
Red Rock Gallery
Karntakarnta Billy Thomas was born near Kulyayi (Well 42). It was while he was droving cattle on the Canning Stock Route that he first met Rover Thomas. They went on to work together and settle in the Kimberley, both of them finding fame late in life as Kimberley artists. Earlier Billy had worked as a police tracker, a traditional healer and a stockman — and had 12 children.

Accession ID: 20131014_FORM_MIRA_B0045_0087

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

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