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yiwarra kuju

Yiwarra Kuju in Perth

Location: Perth, WA

Date: 2011

Event Description: The record-breaking exhibition of art and new media, Yiwarra Kuju: The Canning Stock Route returned to Western Australia as the cultural backdrop to the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) in October 2011. Produced by FORM and the National Museum of Australia, Yiwarra Kuju was then open to the public throughout November at the Perth Convention and Exhibition Centre supported by a rich calendar of public program events including tours, talks and film screenings. Aboriginal curators and filmmakers, mentored on the Canning Stock Route Project over five years, gathered for its public showing to offer visitors a unique insight into the stories of the exhibition.
During its showing of only a few weeks the exhibition attracted 32,977 visitors, over 45 school tours as well as substantial attention from the media

People: Claude Carter, Steven James

Art Centre(s): Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Culture Centre

Media Description: Majarrka dancers painted up. One Road festival day, Yiwarra Kuju: the Canning Stock Route, Perth 2011.

Rights: Photo by Tim Acker

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Culture Centre, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Hayley Atkins

 

Hayley Atkins - curating experience [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Hayley Atkins talks at length about her experience curating the Yiwarra Kuju exhibition. She talks about things she has learned, and also about her favourite paintings.

Date: 2009-11-18
Art centre(s): CSR Project, Martumili Artists
Language spoken: English
Catalogue number: CSROH_212_Hayley_Atkins
Date: 2009-11-18
Location Recorded: Old Halls Creek
Latitude/Longitude: -18.251269/127.782303

Cultural Protocols: Public Access
Access: Public
Full transcript: Carly Davenport: Hayley you were actually the first emerging curator working on the whole project, and you started back in Well 36, that trip in 2007. Do you want to talk a little bit about what this trip was like for you working with Martumilli artists and all of this team? Hayley Atkins: Yeah, when I first ... CD: Ooh ... Nicole Ma: What? CD: Microphone. NM: Oh! NM: Thank you, okay. CD: So yeah, so do you wanna start talking about the Well 36 Return to Country trip? HA: Before that ... Gabreille told me about the stock route, and I was sayin’ to Gabrielle, ‘what is the stock route?’ [laughs]. She said, Well 33 is one of them, it starts from Wiluna to Halls Creek, and I was thinkin’ yep, I wanted to go check it out. They ... Gabrielle told me if I could work on the stock route project ... so I said yes! But still you know ... I was thinking in my head, I didn’t know what the stock route was ... yeah, and finally we made it to 33, and we went bit further to Well 34 then 35, then we all met there. And I get to [XX - ?] and ... me with all the other artists too. Then we all got introduced and that’s where ... when JJ Jefferey James was alive then, he introduced me to all the old people and to all the mob and told me that I was connected to them as well, and JJ was saying ‘this is your granddaughter’ to the old people [laughs], and I was excited too ‘cause I didn’t know. From there, that’s where I learnt how to paint as well, with the old people. These old people was just painting and reading out a lot of stories, a lotta things I didn’t know, like the background of the bushman days, and that’s where I didn’t know that my grandmother Milly Kelly, I didn’t know she used to live up Widjimung [?] lake. Even my dad and mum, my grandparents, they come from the bush as well. So all these stories was just coming and I was just getting excited to know ... I just wanted to really go in deep to the Canning Stock Route Project. CD: So Martumilli Artists have got one of the biggest mobs of the whole exhibition, the whole project. HA: Yeah Martumilli have like worked with six communities, and there’s a lot of artists, even young people, and most of them paint, they, where they come from, and yeah. CD: That means more hard work from you [laughs], keeping up with the mob. HA: Mmm. CD: Hayley, do you wanna talk a little bit about some, I guess good memories, or highlights about what you’ve learnt along the way? Like with working with all the Martumilli artists in that group and then travelling the whole length of the stock route that way, and working with Wally Caruana, working with Monique and John and me ... what’s some of the good memories of the last few years, that you’ve ... HA: [sighs and smiles] CD: Too much? HA: Mmm ... good memories was like travelling on the Stock Road, and even actually seeing the spots and the stories and hearing from the old people, they actually showing you where it happened and where they was walkin’ around ... Even I learn a lot with Wally, like how does stories and the painting really connect and how you have to always like make them sit together, with the colours and the stories, yeah that’s the part I like, I learnt, like ‘cause I didn’t know anything about painting and even the stories when I started working with Martumilli. Gabrielle told me ‘oh you know, when you start working with Canning Stock Route Project, and I was thinkin’, ‘no I don’t wanna work ‘cause I don’t know anything’, but I just want to work so I can just go out there and know everything like painting and stories, I was doing it so it was like a journey for me, like knowing the families and the stories so I was just so proud to be on this project and that’s where I ... I learned how to paint so, the first painting was about my Stock Route painting [laughs]. NM: What was it of, that painting? HA: It was where ... the Seven Sisters were ... um Well 36. Where there was the water, the Seven Sisters created and the men lying down next to it, that’s what I painted. And we got bogged, me and Gabrielle. Another painting was ... Braden Pool, where we had the lunch, we had a lunch there. And ... CD: We hear she got bogged. HA: Another painting, we were sleeping at Well 35, and I painted the Seven Sisters in the sky, like stars. CD: Hayley why do you think it’s so important to listen to the old people? HA: Because they, they know everything, they know the bush life. They got this knowledge, they know the Dreaming and boundaries, everything. They lived that life. Like, it’s changed now ‘cause they all living in a town, and a house. But, so it’s a bit different from living in a town and living out in the bush. Yeah. So it’s good for people, whitefella, whitefellas and young people like us to know the connection and everything, to know that we all just connected no matter what language, different language we speak, but we just one family. CD: From that ... putting that exhibition together, that big special group with everyone contributing. What do you think’s been the most special for you in learning how that show’s gonna work together and sit together? HA: The exhibition itself, like, he tells many stories big and small and by the looks of the exhibition right now it’s, you can already see it ... all the connection, like ... like how Canning, made all the wells ... straight line, it’s like he put a scratch mark or scar through that stock road. It was like for Aboriginal people living the desert life it was good, until Canning went through there, now the people and the story line, their history is where people just got scattered, went different ways and it’s all coming back now for people to see what really happened and the stories all coming back. How it was back then. Like they were living their life singing and dancing through the law, that’s what was precious to them back then and families and connections, they ... um ... waterholes, Dreaming, everything, it was all theirs, and they want to tell the whole world it’s still theirs, you know, and it’s always been theirs since, and it’s good that they ... it’s good that people painting and everything it’s all in there for the other people to know, yeah so, so they could never forget where they come from. Yeah. CD: That old man that passed away he was the real big leader wasn’t he, from Kunawarritji? HA: Yeah he was, I didn’t really wanted him to go, ‘cause it was a bit too early ‘cause he know all the families belong to my grandfather, from [XX - ?]. CD: I mean you know first hand better than anyone because Martumilli Artists have so strongly wanted this project to happen, and that’s why we’ve got so many artists. Do you wanna talk about how you’ve worked with the elders guiding you and what we’re doing in that trip we just did all across the communities? And even now I guess, but even more I guess with your Country too and you making sure they’re happy and ... HA: Um yeah, people that I worked with Martumilli the biggest mob, we have the biggest mob of all the people, mostly they paint sometimes Canning Stock Router, ‘cause they were walking around through there getting contact with the white people for the first time, and they just love to paint and tell their stories, they want people to know about the bushman days. Even the bush tuckers and how they camped, many things been happening, even funny stories [laughs]. And so when I talk to them they talk non-stop and I feel excited when I’m with the old people ‘cause you get a lot out of them and they can teach you a lot of things, even how to sing and dance. CD: And you reckon they’re really keen to let all the [XX - ?] and young ones to know all about this too? HA: Yeah, that’s why they work so hard, they paint and just want the people to know, like get it out there to them, and they can get familiar with all the names of the place. Yeah, but I get really into them, like I really wanna know where they come from and the family tree as well. CD: What’s it been like working with Terry and Louise? HA: [Smiles] It was fantastic ‘cause, Terry and Louise know more than me, how to work, like, when I started first working, I didn’t really know much, but now I just know. So um, yeah we work really good. CD: And you have a bit of fun? HA: Yeah, so we get along just fine [laughs]. CD: And what about say working with Nola and Tom in different ways, different places? HA: Yeah with Nola ... working with her like, she helped me a lot. ‘Cause I don’t speak much of Manyjilyjarra I just, I can listen right, I can understand it a little, but not those hard words, so that’s why I wanted Nola to come in. But first, when I worked with this project, ‘cause too much was coming into my head, like all this screaming, you know, I was bit uncomfortable. Like, this is a big thing you know, could ... get in trouble, so, that’s why I asked if Nola could come on board and work with us, and check with the every old people to check if they want to work and story to be told. But actually everybody likes it and yeah there was no concern, only some stuff. So, yeah that’s good I got Nola on the board. And, Tom they really good. CD: What do you reckon of this Kimberley trip so far? We’ve still got to go to Balgo and Mulan. HA: Yeah, I’m lookin’ forward to meetin’ all the people there, ‘cause like, I’m connected to Wompi and Kumpaya and I like to go there and meet people and to know like, how people connected to that way. Yeah, it’s good to know, it good to meet a lot of people I like on this trip, and it’s just good to go and show them the exhibition and talk to them where everything is, so they’re happy CD: What’s the most important thing for you that you’ve learnt along this journey? HA: Mmm ... everything really. Mmm, the Country itself and the people, yeah and the history about it and to get to know other people as well [nods[].Mmmm, get to meet them, especially to get to know the artists, yeah, get to meet all the people ‘cause they know, they know people from where I came and yeah, there’s like this connection everywhere, no matter where you go, or how far you go, yeah. CD: What do you reckon of all of us working towards that big party opening in Canberra at the National Museum next year? HA: [smiles] I can’t wait actually, it’s gonna be good fun, yeah um, I will be there, everybody will be there, like, coming together, you know, one people. No matter where we come from, you know, everybody has a story to tell. CD: That’s gonna be a lot of hard work, especially the curator and multimedia mob. HA: Yeah. CD: There gonna be physically building that show in. HA: I can’t wait for that actually, I just wanna be there and can’t stop thinkin’ about it. Yeah, lookin’ forward. NM: There’s a lot of different things to do with the show, a lot of stories and Country and languages, and a lot of people will also be coming to see the show, some people will know alot and some people won’t know anything. So what would you ... what would be the one thing that you would hope that people will take from it, or get out of the show, from seeing the show? HA: To understand the boundaries and know the sacred places and you have to be there with like, going into that Country you have to take a owner, who know that Country and talk that language and ... to understand that we just all connected through our skin colours and that Aboriginal people respect their Dreaming and ... yeah, to respect some sacred sites, and just to – this is who we are as Aboriginal person, you know, this is how they been living, and to just learn about the history and what did happen on the Stock Road it happen, so, just to learn about the past and just to ... yeah just to learn about the history itself, and yeah. NM: That first thing you said about boundaries, why do you think that it’s important to learn about that? HA: ‘Cause, boundaries is like going into somebody’s country. And you have to take a person who know that country, like you don’t just drive past it and go to any rock, hills, or water, there could be sacred sites there, and anything could happen to you. CD: So people respect the guarding mob they gotta respect the Aboriginal way knowledge, when they come into Aboriginal country? HA: Yeah, so hopefully when you driving out, and wanna check out the desert without anyone knowing, so you need to take somebody that knows that Country. NM: What would you say to someone, who says you know, ‘I’ve got a map – I’ve got a Canning Map, you know, I know where I’m going, I don’t need anyone’. HA: As long as they just stick to the road – the Stock Road. If you just drive anywhere, like anything can happen. Like these are some sacred places. NM: So do you think this exhibition will help them understand that a little bit, that there’s a lot of little things going on around there. HA: Yeah. NM: Not just that it’s one road, that they just drive up and down? CD: Hayley what do you think about the title, the new title that Martu mob have offered to all the other mobs, that could be our title? HA: Yeah. CD: Do you wanna say it, like tell the audience what that title is? HA: Yeah, that title is Yiwarra Kuju – it’s mean One Road. And it came from the Manyjilyjarra word, so but we got nine art centres and nine language, that’s big, because all the language group, yeah, we have to try and talk about that title, and which title we can have for the exhibition. So, we asked Martumili mob, so they came up with that word. So I guess, hope, they are happy with that. CD: Do you like the title? HA: Mmm ... yep – and I hope other people like it too. CD: [XX - ?] HA: Yeah. Yeah, they make sense ‘cause it’s just one road, not any other road. So – it’s one road – but many people got stories for it. CD: Hayley, what’s your favourite part of the exhibition, what section or theme do you like working with? HA: Seven Sisters. CD: Can you talk about maybe the artist names that are in there? HA: [XX - ?], [XX - ?], Nancy Chapman, [XX - ?], big Seven Sister painting from three sisters, and Nan’s painting. CD: and why do you like Seven sisters so much, coz that was your first painting as well? HA: Yeah it was, the story about Seven Sisters, that one man was chasing seven girls and wanted to make them wife, but they didn’t like him, and that Seven Sisters story go right through to South Australia and Northern Territory, so it’s a huge story for Seven Sisters. And they created a lot of water and a lot of places, so that’s how I like it. CD: Good. NM: Very Good. CD: Beautiful. NM: Thankyou. CD: Thanks Hayley. CD: It’ll be good when Gabrielle watches that one day, she’ll be so stoked. HA: Yeah, I wanna go back home, and do painting – second one – with you on the phone (laughs) – Gabrielle wanted me to do that – she liked it. NM: What painting’s that? HA: And I really liked it too. CD: She made a special one ... HA: I’s tryna keep it for you. CD: Of me on a satellite phone [laughs]. HA: With that jeans! [points] CD: With these jeans? HA: Yeah! Tryna paint that clothes too. HA: It was very nice. HA: Yeah. NM: Which of the paintings is in the show? HA: Nothing. CD: No. NM: Or we can put it in the ... HA: Book? NM: Signature piece? You know that interactive. CD: Mmmm – well a couple of Hayley’s one in particular would be the Tinka, Gabrielle in the swag, you in the swag in the starry night – that would be a wonderful one for ... HA: Gabrielle got that painting on her wall. CD: She owns that one yeah. HA: I been ask for ... I wanted them painting back – [laughs] but it was too late and I seen them hanging in headland [laughs] And I think that other one, they sold. NM: What about the one that was [XX - ?] HA: I dunno, must of Gabrielle got it. NM: She got that one too? HA: She got it too and one woman got it from Adelaide. CD: See, if that National Museum had of got on board earlier, they all would of been kept together, but at least we got the best of the best in. END
Video format: DVD/MiniDV/Quicktime movie
Video recording: 107 Kimberley Approvals, Louise, Hayley IVs, Nov 09
Source: CSROH_212_Hayley_Atkins
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Hayley Atkins; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

Putuparri Tom Lawford

 

Putuparri Tom Lawford - advising on the Canning Stock Route Project [ORAL HISTORY]
Synopsis: Putuparri Tom Lawford talks about his work as a cultural advisor on the Canning Stock Route Project, and speaks at length about the issues that surround the exhibition.

Date: 2009-11
Art centre(s): CSR Project, Mangkaja Arts Resource Agency, Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Culture Centre
Language spoken: English
Catalogue number: CSROH_214_Putuparri_Tom_Lawford
Date: 2009-11
Location Recorded: Old Halls Creek
Latitude/Longitude: -18.251269/127.782303

Cultural Protocols: Public Access
Access: Public
Full transcript: Nicole Ma: Maybe what we should do is just say who it is and the day. Putuparri Tom Lawford: So I look straight at that camera, or there? NM: Let’s see you looking at Carly. It’s good if you could do both, because you’re talking to her and you’re talking to the audience too so whatever you feel like. Carly Davenport: So we’re talking to Tom Lawford on the 18 November at Palm Springs I think it’s called, just outside of the top of Halls Creek … So Tom, you’ve been working on the project the longest out of everyone in terms of the full team. What, what do you think’s been the best thing that you’ve seen in working with all the other people from all the different areas coming together? TL: Best thing is seeing all their hard work coming together, one big area in Canberra and all the old people handed on that stuff, we got some sent with us and yeah, it’s all getting exciting, and yeah. CD: And you started working with the Return to Country trip in 2007 as cultural advisor and translator and you’ve been in that role ever since, and from that first big trip to Country, how have you seen the project grow? TL: Well from a little trip, it turned out to be a big trip and today it’s getting more big, and too all this stuff will be not only here in Australia but travellin’ round a good way to showcase Canning Stock Road where people come from and what it mean to them. CD: And what do you think it means to them? TL: The Canning Stock Road is place of spiritual, like a Dreaming place for old people and this fella just came along and put wells in there, and all that area is Countrymen people, but Dreaming place too. And another that thing he did, that road it move people away to different towns. And another way – it’s a good thing too so people know where they come from, and their families, and they can travel on the stock road to meet people they know quicker. CD: And for telling the story for history the right way, because a lot of people are telling us this, this is the right way it should be told for Fitzroy Crossing people, what do you think they value in the project? TL: Well, Fitzroy people, they’re from that area anyway, the Canning Stock Route area, and they all left to come into stations and town and, like it’s, to them it’s like showing where they come from and where they belong to, where there heart is really, what they paint, what people paint – it’s not line or anything, it there Country, how they see it and this project, yeah, gonna do real good for them and it’s gonna open a lot of eyes – white people eyes – to find out the history of the Canning Stock Route through Aboriginal people. CD: And do you think that Fitzroy Crossing people are really happy for that message to go all around the world? TL: Yeah, yeah, they all happy and welcome. CD: And tell us a little bit about your role, it’s been a really important one for everything we’ve done form the beginning, anything you wanted to say or talk about … TL: What I’m doing on the project really is making sure what you mob say or do is the way that we feel is culturally not the wrong way. Like getting stories from one people sometimes, you know they, don’t like telling stories, like they can tell you a story, good stories, but some people don’t tell you other stories because too sad or something, but yeah, my job is to make sure that everything is working smooth, and going on … following that one line, not turning off and anyway. CD: Yeah, you’ve really helped with helping for trust with all the old people especially, and young people to go yeah, that project, that team, they’re doing alright, and Putuparri’s working with them, and if they get off track, he’ll make sure they get curators on the right track, so it’s been really valuable. How’ve you found the young curators on the project so far? TL: Yeah they alright, they learning too, they alright, yeah they getting there. You know, you got Louise from Kununurra and she’s from, we’re all from a different tribe and a different area and working on this Canning Stock Route Project, and yeah she’s doing real good, getting there. CD: And Murungkurr Terry Murray? TL: Yeah, he’s an alright bloke, he, yeah, happy go lucky bloke, and he don’t like to talk too much but, he doing the best he can and yeah, and them three young curators, Hayley, Louise and Terry, they make them old people proud with what they’re doin’, and they should be proud because they, they up there, the main people. CD: Tom in your work for [KALACC - ?] and lots of different things, for that movie and all around the world, you’ve been doing lots of different things for your people. How do you feel, as a custodian of this project, that this message will be received from people around other countries? TL: Yeah, well I’m sure that a lot of people from other countries heard about the Canning Stock Route, but not through what we’re doing, what we’re doing is from a different way of what they’re seein’ or heard about the Canning Stock Route, like it’s through Indigenous people, through our people, how they are seeing the Canning Stock Route come to life. CD: Do you wanna talk a little bit about some of the histories, and things that you, that happened out there at all? TL: Yeah, I know a little bit about what happened, a lot of killings mainly, there’s all that, and our, most of our old people was working for all them mob, taking cattle up to Wyndham, and they were meeting people on the road, black people, bush people, and telling them you gotta go back this way, there’s a big mission there, and taking people back. CD: People were treated really roughly weren’t they? TL: Yeah, some people were treated real rough, and a couple of ladies got treated real bad too, there too, from Canning and his crew. CD: Do you reckon that arts a really good way of getting those stories out for people to accept and learn and talk about? TL: [nods] This project we’re doing, this project is doing what – the history thing, but real history that’s coming up through the project, through painting and stories, that’s where people will see what happened on the Canning Stock Route. They think, tourist think it’s just a road. You can travel on the Canning Stock Route, but the Canning Stock Route got a lot of history from Wiluna to [XX - ?]. CD: And your role, really importantly as translator, you know many languages, do you wanna talk a little bit about the different languages and the different groups, so the people can really understand that it’s not just one people? TL: Yeah, for the Canning Stock Route, there’s too many different language groups in a room , you know you got Martu people, [XX - ?] people, [XX - ?], [XX - ?] , you know, [XX - ?] all mixed and they all from one area, from the one road, but they’re all living in towns, you know some live in [XX - ?], Fitzroy, down here near Halls Creek, they all everywhere, but all from that Country and they all got stories to tell in their own different language group, that’s why I do translate all their stories into English from all their different language group and make sure that it’s all right story not other story. CD: Has that been a really big job for you? TL: Yeah, big job – sometimes it hard, sometimes easy but we have to do it, to figure it out. Some good stories, some sad stories, But that’s how life goes, I guess. NM: What would, if there was one thing that people would take away from looking at this exhibition, what would you hope that that would be, the one main thing? TL: What I hope the people take away from this exhibition is the truth of what the Canning Stock Route is about , and yeah, the truth really. How the Canning Stock Route came about. How it moved people all around the Kimberly area. CD: How important is leadership for all the young people for all the different jobs? How important do you think it is for these young ones to work in the arts, work in film? TL: I reckon it’s important because art tell you too many stories, old people, stories they paint, that little painting or big painting tell you too many stories about that Country and it’s important because young people now days don’t understand that, you know. And the mob now growing up need to understand that isn’t just a painting, they look at it like ‘ahh, look at this painting, it’s just lines over this dots and this scribble everywhere’, but all them things got stories, got meaning and, like that old lady when she paint that tree Well 35 story, and when you have a look at it, that’s not a painting. But that painting’s got history, too many stories, and that’s what these young people they don’t understand. I think through this project it might make them more understand. CD: You were the main facilitator, you were the dude that put the whole Ngumpan workshop together, and some of the things you said at the time were pretty important when it came to the old people exchanging to the younger people, can you say anything about that intergenerational sharing? TL: Yeah, that woman, with the [XX - ?] woman, [XX - ?], [XX - ?], there’s one dance that hasn’t been performed for a number of years, because it’s Country on the Canning Stock Route, and we decided that we should ask this old fella, grandfather, [XX - ?], teach this other old fella, old Hanson Boxer, that dance and yeah, and teachin’ and singing them all singin’, and we had a meeting there, a lot of old ladies, Mon was there, Me, Tim I think, just talking about all the dances, [Kaningarra - ?], that dance and talking about to open up again so people can learn and sing and dance again, and it happened at Ngumpan, yeah. Hansen Boxer he danced a song and old people. What made me notice was, old people, they only really the ones who know how to sing it, and they aren’t gonna be there too long and we need to do more teaching, that’s what, were I work, back in Fitzroy, we’re talking about recording all these songs, the whole lot from [XX - ?] right down to [XX - ?] and the new one and other stuff too, you know record. CD: For that Ngumpan workshop there, it was the biggest group of people wasn’t there? TL: Yeah well, we cater for about 40 or 30 people but more than that came, we had too many kids, yeah all the kids were there doing something dancing – that’s teaching yeah, from old people down to the young ones and they’re all , yeah, they like dancing all them kids. CD: Was it true that all them young boys were lined up at the petrol station trying to get into cars? TL: Yeah, when we went into town to pick up a couple of stuff from [XX - ?] and fuel up, there were all these blokes, or one bloke come ask me for a lift to [XX - ?], and I said, ‘yeah come on, you can come’, and I thought it was one, then we had a car load. All these young boy from [XX - ?]. We take ‘em back and they all camped there, camped at the spring. They all had come for this workshop and plus we had ladies there teachin’ young girls how to make coolamon, boomerang making stuff, and collecting little [XX - ?] or little grass [XX - ?], yeah we camped there, one week. CD: And through this project time, do you wanna remember and list all the places and communities that you’ve been workin’ with [XX - ?], you’ve been to a lot of different parts of the Western deserts together, just so the audience can understand how you’ve been moving around. TL: Yeah, well from [XX - ?] to Cotton Creek, [laughs] ahh, from Cotton Creek to 33, yeah from everywhere [XX - ?], [XX - ?], [XX - ?], Fitzroy, this project here it take me everywhere, I thought, to me really this project was only in our area, but he went right down, goes through too many language groups, and you know you got , probably get people living in Perth and they probably come from that area, parents or grandparents come from [XX - ?]. And yeah, it’s in a way real good meeting up with people, other people from that one road, through the project. And these girls are, Hayley and Louise, and young Morika, for them too, you open their eyes too so they can meet other people, make them more proud in what they’re doing. CD: You’ve been to Perth as well, next year when we launch this exhibition you’ve got a really important job, because if anything, you know you’re keeping an eye on all of us, making sure everything’s happening properly. You’re very much the statesman for the project, for the politicians, leaders from around all the other states who will be coming and do you wanna … ? TL: Yeah well next year I’m gonna be the main part, so I’ll be making sure that people like John [laughs], and everybody doing the right thing. And yeah, we’ll have ministers and all kind of people there. All them people, who don’t even know about the Canning Stock Route, and with what they seen, they’ll find out what the Canning Stock Route is really. CD: Also a good chance to talk to them about any other ideas or things that KALACC is needing or wanting, what the old people are saying, you’re gonna have a direct communication. TL: Yeah well, when we’re talking in [XX - ?] too yeah, yeah like [XX - ?] and all kind of people I think through this project, them kartiya people might see what we do through FORM with this CSRP and then we got Kimberley people and Pilbara people, they’re strong people, strong minded people, so we gotta talk to them more. NM: Probably that’s a lot of what people don’t know that there are strong people there, you only hear the bad news. TL: Yeah, because what we do at KALACC, we do other stuff too – bringing back remains, and this and from Canberra mob too, so then find out that we people, we know nothing we got, we can talk to them and through this project we got one road, one, like all the people, all from that CSR they got one mind and one heart. One wangka [language], that’s what will make them see. CD: That’s beautiful. NM: Yeah. TL: That’s why this project got started, because there’s so much talent, so much strong talent and people in the region in a remote area, and that’s what the rest of the world needs to know. And particularly through KALACC and Mangkaja, that valley, in that valley there’s just so much happening. TL: Yeah, not too many stuff happening in Fitzroy at the moment. CD: Families are strong there though. TL: Mmm. CD: That’s the other thing that comes out from this project, really naturally, people sharing their stories. TL: Yeah, like this project, he like a family, like one big family, we all go together like one big family, from one area. Even though we come from other language group, different language groups. We’re all one. And from that one is that one history of all the whole road. CD: Wow, that’s cool NM: Fantastic. END
Video format: DVD/MiniDV/Quicktime movie
Video recording: 106 Kimberley Approvals, Tom, Louise IV's, Nov 09
Source: CSROH_214_Putuparri_Tom_Lawford
Rights: Cultural Owner & Storyteller: Putuparri Tom Lawford; © FORM, transcript only

Provenance: This material is sourced from Ngurra Kuju Walyja — the Canning Stock Route Project, which was initiated in 2006 by FORM and developed in partnership with Birriliburu, Kayili, KALACC, Mangkaja, Martumili, Ngurra, Papunya Tula, Paruku IPA, Warlayirti and Yulparija artists and art centres.

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